Community Cultural & Diversity Calendar

Stay in the know about what’s happening around Spokane!
Stop here to find family-friendly, educational, or racial & social justice oriented events going on in or around the area.


Women’s History Month

  • National Women’s History Month began as a single week and as a local event. In 1978, Sonoma County, California, sponsored a women’s history week to promote the teaching of women’s history. The week of March 8 was selected to include “International Women’s Day.” This day is rooted in such ideas and events as a woman’s right to vote and a woman’s right to work, women’s strikes for bread, women’s strikes for peace at the end of World War I, and the U.N. Charter declaration of gender equality at the end of World War II. This day is an occasion to review how far women have come in their struggle for equality, peace and development. In 1981, Congress passed a resolution making the week a national celebration, and in 1987 expanded it to the full month of March. The 2021 theme is Valiant Women of the Vote: Refusing to be Silenced continues to celebrate the Suffrage Centennial” celebrates the women who have fought for woman’s right to vote in the United States.
  • For more information visit http://www.nwhp.org/.

Irish American Heritage Month

  • A month to honor the contributions of over 44 million Americans who trace their roots to Ireland. Celebrations include celebrating St. Patrick’s Day (March 17th) with parades, family gathering, masses, dances, etc. Due to COVID-19, many of these events have been cancelled. For more information visit the Irish-American Heritage Month website at http://irish-american.org/.

The Black Lens

The Black Lens is an independent community publication focused on the news, events, people, issues, and information of importance to the Black community. Sandra Williams is the editor and publisher with a long history of anti-oppression work. She was a founding member of Spokane Community Against Racism (SCAR) and a long time member of the Spokane NAACP.

Learn more about The Black Lens, how to support the paper, and read back issues at blacklensnews.com.

March Issue


Events In Spokane – March 2021

The below list of Spokane area diversity/cultural events and activities were compiled and provided by Yvonne C. Montoya Zamora. If you know of a diversity/cultural event open to the public that you would like added to this diversity monthly calendar, please e-mail Yvonne C. Montoya Zamora at yvonnecmz04@gmail.com with event details. Thank you!

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Local Events In Spokane This March

  • Winterfest: Lighted Holiday
    Winter Wonderland includes a Dragon, lots of pandas, Kung Fu Panda, Reindeer, Rudolph, and lots of hand painted cultural trees, along with a few lighted lantern trees.
    Date: Friday, November 14, 2020 – Saturday, March 20, 2021.
    Location: Mirabeau Park Hotel and Convention Center, 1100 N Sullivan Rd, Spokane Valley, WA
    Cost: Free
    For more information to visit this event, go to https://northwestwinterfest.com/.
  • She Traveled Solo: Strong Women in the Early 20th Century
    During a 5,000-mile solo bicycle ride from southern California to Maine, Tessa Hulls heard the same thing daily: that a woman can’t travel alone. She began researching other women who traveled solo in different ways, and became fascinated with many in stories from the early 20th century: explorers, mountaineers, and even a circus performer—women who defied expectations and embarked on unprecedented journeys, but whose stories have remained largely untold.
    Using historical photographs, primary documents, and hand-drawn illustrations, Hulls takes participants into the lives of intrepid female adventurers who lived through the turn of the 20th century—before the right to vote or the right to own property. In sharing these stories and her own, Hulls illuminates the power of history in today’s world and demonstrates why female role models are vital in affecting social change.
    Tessa Hulls is a multidisciplinary artist, writer, and outdoorswoman who focuses on women’s stories, and her writing has appeared in the Washington Post and Atlas Obscura’s Kickass Women series.
    Date: Tuesday, March 2, 2021
    Time: 4:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-she-traveled-solo-strong-women-in-the-early-20th-century-5/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by NCW Libraires.
  • Tangled: Why Your Hair Matters to Society
    Hair is simply a collection of protein filaments that sprout from our scalp, yet it carries great meaning for us and our society. From twists and tapers to braids and buns, what’s on top of our head and how it is received by others often reflects society’s standards of beauty and desirability. Using song, video, poetry, and imagery, this interactive presentation encourages us to examine our cultural conceptions of gender, class, and race. Why, for example, is one kind of hair or hair style understood as “better” than another? Who says so? What are the consequences of sporting an unruly doo, and how has that changed over the years?
    Join professor Anu Taranath to untangle the meaning of hair, and better understand the stories we tell about beauty, bias, and belonging. Anu Taranath is a professor at the University of Washington specializing in global literature, identity, race, and equity. She is the author of the book, Beyond Guilt Trips: Mindful Travel in an Unequal World, as well as a consultant for schools, colleges, libraries, community organizations and government agencies on social justice and global issues.
    Date: Wednesday, March 3, 2021
    Time: 10:30am
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-tangled-why-your-hair-matters-to-society/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Hagan Center at Spokane Community College.
  • Is Truth Really Dead in America?
    Alternative facts, fake news, post-truth—these phrases have flooded the American conversation over the past several years. But how bad is it really, and what can we, as a society and as individuals, do to be better informed?
    WSU professor Steven Stehr investigates the roots and consequences of the erosion of truth, with a focus on politics and science. From the rise of conspiracy theories to the echo chamber of social media, Stehr leads a conversation that asks to what extent are we living in a post-truth world? Have both political parties used deception to their advantage? How does the use of knowledge and facts vary in different policy debates?
    Date: Wednesday, March 3, 2021
    Time: 2:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register.
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-is-truth-really-dead-in-america-5/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Walla Walla Community College.
  • Let It Not Happen Again: Lessons of the Japanese American Exclusion
    In March of 1942, 227 Japanese Americans were forcibly removed from their homes on Bainbridge Island by the US Army. Starting with this small community, a national strategy began, with more than 120,000 Japanese American men, women, and children forcibly removed and incarcerated during World War II.
    Clarence Moriwaki shares the story of Bainbridge Island—the origin point of the Japanese American exclusion—to provide a human, historical account of this national tragedy, and to ask the question: Are there parallels to what’s happening in America now? Moriwaki is the president of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community and a founder and former president of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial Association.
    Date: Wednesday, March 3, 2021
    Time: 2:30 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-let-it-not-happen-again-lessons-of-the-japanese-american-exclusion-7/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by the Seattle Parks and Recreation, Lifelong Recreation.
  • Tangled: Why Your Hair Matters to Society
    See description at the Wednesday, March 3, 2021 event, 10:30 am.
    Date: Wednesday, March 3, 2021
    Time: 6:30 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-tangled-why-your-hair-matters-to-society-2/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Hagan Center at Spokane Community College.
  • Spokane Jewish Cultural Film Festival
    Featuring Breaking Bread, Crescendo, The Crossing. Incitement, My Name is Sara, Reawakening, Space Torah. They Ain’t Ready for Me and Those Who Remained
    Dates: Saturday/Sunday. March 3-12, 2021
    Time: 7:00 pm
    Location: Virtual
    Cost: $5.00 each film, visit https://watch.eventive.org/sjcff for film purchase and information.
    For more information visit their website at http://sajfs.org/our-programs/sjcff/.
  • The Country that Fiction Built
    Ask who Atticus Finch is, and most will remember him from high school English as the heroic lawyer defending an unjustly charged African-American man in To Kill a Mockingbird. Ever since Harper Lee imagined him into life in 1960, the name “Atticus Finch” has become shorthand for a person who acts according to their conscience, not majority rule.
    This talk delves into the many ways our country is deeply shaped by Harper Lee, as well as by the best-selling author who lived in the century before her—Harriet Beecher Stowe. Using To Kill a Mockingbird and Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin— the novel largely credited with moving the United States into the Civil War— Michelle Liu invites participants to think about how these two works of fiction still fundamentally shape how we think about skin color, morality, and who counts as human. How can fiction help us imagine building more empathy and openness to those with experiences different from our own?
    Michelle Liu is a professor in the English department at the University of Washington, where she specializes in teaching writing and exploring ideas about identity, history, emotion, and storytelling. Liu also has spoken at the University of Washington Zhejiang Summer Program to undergraduate-age Chinese students to introduce them to racial dynamics in the Seattle area. Liu earned her PhD in American studies from Yale University.
    Date: Wednesday, March 3, 2021
    Time: 7:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register, click on “buy a ticket”
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-the-country-that-fiction-built-3/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Bainbridge (Island Branch of the Kitsap Regional Library.
  • 2021 Deepening Our Roots – Fig Tree Benefit Lunch
    The Fig Tree’s Annual Benefit Lunch is an opportunity to celebrate The Fig Tree monthly newspaper and Annual Resource Directory as they connect people and inspire action. Hosts and sponsors cover the cost of the lunch and invite guests to come, hear The Fig Tree story and donate to support the work that spreads hope and improves lives. The Fig Tree media promotes media literacy, media responsibility and freedom of the press.
    Date: Friday, March 5, 2021
    Time: Groups 11:40 am, Slides 11:50 am, Program at noon to 12:30 pm
    Location: Virtual via Zoom
    Cost: Guests will be invited to donate to support The Fig Tree
    For more information and to rsvp, call 509.4112 or 509.535.1813
  • KPBX Kid’s Concert – Floating Crowbar
    Don’t miss this great Kids’ Concert that will get you and the whole family dancing. Warm up in these winter weeks with some wonderful Celtic music from Floating Crowbar. Performers include James Hunter, Morgan Andersen, Rick Ruben, and Don Thomsen.
    Date: Saturday, March 6, 2021
    Time: 1:00 pm
    Location: On KPBX 91.1. And you can also stream the concert online, on your phone, or through your smart speaker.
    Cost: Free and open to the public
    For more information, visit https://www.spokanepublicradio.org/topic/spr-events.
  • Spokane Buddhist Temple Services
    The weekly Shin Buddhist Service, hosted by Reverend Melissa Opel and Minister Assistant Chad Donoho is followed by either a Sangha hangout or a Dharma discussion breakout room.
    Dates: Sundays, March 7, 14, 21, and 28, 2021
    Time: 10:30 am – 11:30 am Location: Virtual, email SpokaneBuddhistTemple@gmail.com for the Zoom link.
    Cost: Free For more information visit their website at https://spokanebuddhisttemple.org
  • Women Lead Virtual Conference 2021 – Gonzaga University
    Join us for our Spring 2021 virtual conference! Whether you are a woman in leadership, working your way to becoming a leader, or simply want to support women’s right to equality in the workplace, we hope you join us for a day of inspirational speakers, skill-building workshops and empowering discussions.
    Date: Monday, March 8, 2021
    Time: 8:30 am – 3:30 pm Location: Virtual via Zoom
    Cost: $179.00, includes all speakers and workshops For more information and to register, email womenlead@gonzaga.edu.
  • She Traveled Solo: Strong Women in the Early 20th Century
    See description at the Tuesday, March 2, 2021 event at 4:00 pm.
    Date: Tuesday, March 9, 2021
    Time: 6:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-she-traveled-solo-strong-women-in-the-early-20th-century-6/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Puyallup Public Library.
  • 2021 Deepening Our Roots – Fig Tree Benefit Breakfast
    Date: Wednesday, March 10, 2021
    Time: Groups 7:40, Slides 7:50 am, program 8:00 am-8:30 am 7:00, program is 7:30 am to 8:30 am
    Location: Virtual via Zoom
    Cost: Guests will be invited to donate to support The Fig Tree
    For more information and to RSVP, call 509.4112 or 509.535.1813
  • SCC Hagan Center Diversity Series
    Presentation by Tracy K. Smith, 2017 U.S. Poet Laureate, teacher at Princeton University and host of a daily radio program and podcast for American Public Media.
    Date: Wednesday, March 10, 2021
    Time: 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Location: Watch at scc.spokane.edu/live.
    Cost: Free and open to the public
    For more information visit https://scc.spokane.edu/News-Events/Live-Events.
  • The Country that Fiction Built
    Ask who Atticus Finch is, and most will remember him from high school English as the heroic lawyer defending an unjustly charged African-American man in To Kill a Mockingbird. Ever since Harper Lee imagined him into life in 1960, the name “Atticus Finch” has become shorthand for a person who acts according to their conscience, not majority rule.
    This talk delves into the many ways our country is deeply shaped by Harper Lee, as well as by the best-selling author who lived in the century before her—Harriet Beecher Stowe. Using To Kill a Mockingbird and Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin— the novel largely credited with moving the United States into the Civil War— Michelle Liu invites participants to think about how these two works of fiction still fundamentally shape how we think about skin color, morality, and who counts as human. How can fiction help us imagine building more empathy and openness to those with experiences different from our own?
    Michelle Liu is a professor in the English department at the University of Washington, where she specializes in teaching writing and exploring ideas about identity, history, emotion, and storytelling. Liu also has spoken at the University of Washington Zhejiang Summer Program to undergraduate-age Chinese students to introduce them to racial dynamics in the Seattle area. Liu earned her PhD in American studies from Yale University.
    Date: Wednesday, March 10, 2021
    Time: 5:30 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-the-country-that-fiction-built-4/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Online Speakers Bureau Event, Lacey.
  • Hispanic Business / Professional Association (HBPA) Monthly Meeting
    Speaker (Sabes Que): TBA
    Date: Wednesday, March 10, 2021
    Time: 6:00 pm
    Location: Via Zoom at https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85346163890?pwd=SmhyQitiVHF1MUZrVENCOTkvTjJmUT09
    Cost: Free
    For more information visit their website at www.hbpaofspokane.org.
  • Tangled: Why Your Hair Matters to Society
    See description at the Wednesday, March 3, 2021 event, 10:30 am.
    Date: Thursday, March 11, 2021
    Time: 1:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-tangled-why-your-hair-matters-to-society-3/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. White River Valley Museum.
  • Is Truth Really Dead in America?
    Alternative facts, fake news, post-truth—these phrases have flooded the American conversation over the past several years. But how bad is it really, and what can we, as a society and as individuals, do to be better informed?
    WSU professor Steven Stehr investigates the roots and consequences of the erosion of truth, with a focus on politics and science. From the rise of conspiracy theories to the echo chamber of social media, Stehr leads a conversation that asks to what extent are we living in a post-truth world? Have both political parties used deception to their advantage? How does the use of knowledge and facts vary in different policy debates?
    Date: Thursday, March 11, 2021
    Time: 6:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register.
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-is-truth-really-dead-in-america-6/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Online Speakers Bureau Event, Gig Harbor.
  • Comic-Book Reality: Superheroes and the Power of Representation
    Since their debut in the 1930s, comic books have been a regular part of our pop- culture landscape. While often dismissed as escapist entertainment, these pulp treasures also provide a fascinating lens through which to view our nation’s past, present and potential future.
    In this interactive presentation, journalist and educator T. Andrew Wahl explores how everything from social movements to business concerns to changing demographics have shaped the reality seen in the pages of comics. Drawing from comics including Black Panther, Wonder Woman, Captain America, and others, Wahl shows how four-color heroes aren’t merely confined to paper—they shape the world we live in.
    T. Andrew Wahl is a journalist who has worked as an editor and editorial cartoonist. Wahl is a lifelong comic book aficionado, focusing on the Bronze Age (1975-85) of the American comic book. Wahl studied comic-books as a part of his MA in the humanities at Fort Hays State University. He currently teaches journalism at Everett Community College.
    Date: Thursday, March 11, 2021
    Time: 1:30 pm
    Location: On-line, an email with the Zoom link will be sent to registered participants on the date of the event, March 11th.
    Cost: Free, must register.
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-comic-book-reality-superheroes-and-the-power-of-representation-2/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Southwest Seattle Historical Society.
  • She Traveled Solo: Strong Women in the Early 20th Century
    See description at the Tuesday, March 2, 2021 event at 4:00 pm.
    Date: Thursday, March 11, 2021
    Time: 6:30 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register at https://events.spokanelibrary.org/event/4883846
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-she-traveled-solo-strong-women-in-the-early-20th-century-7/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Spokane Public Library.
  • Considering Matthew Shepard: Pre-concert Conversation
    Join us for a pre-concert conversation with Joshua Shank (Spectrum Singers former conductor) and Bobby Kizer (Spectrum Singers Board President) on Gonzaga’s Chamber Chorus’ presentation of the moving story about Matthew Shepard, told in a new staged musical production by Craig Hella Johnson.
    Date: Saturday, March 13, 2021
    Time: 7:00 pm
    Location: On-line via Zoom Webinar, must register at https://gonzaga.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_C2UdykbmSPCmqOcqTwk_Kg.
    Cost: Free and open to the public
    For more information email music@gonzaga.edu.
  • NAACP General Membership Meeting
    Date: Monday, March 15, 2021
    Time: 7:00 pm
    Location: On-line via Zoom
    Cost: Free, meeting open to everyone.
    For more information visit their Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/spokane.naacp/ or visit their website at http://spokanenaacp.com/.
  • How to Start a New Business (en español) | Principios Básicos Para Empezar
    Taxes, insurance, accounting, a business plan, and loans are all things to consider for a successful start to your company. Are you ready? This workshop will help you with these considerations and more.
    Paso por paso de consideraciones legales, impuestos, seguros, contabilidad, plan de negocio, obtención de préstamos que necesitan considerer para un exitoso inicio de su empresa. Están Listos? Este taller lo ayudará con estas consideraciones y más.
    Presented by SCORE Business mentor Victor Vera
    Date: Thursday, March 18, 2021
    Time: noon – 1:30 pm
    Location: On-line via Zoom
    Cost: Free, registration is required, and you’ll need to provide email to receive login information. Es necesario registrarse y necesitará un correo electrónico para recibir la información de inicio de sesión.
    To register, go to https://scld.evanced.info/signup/EventDetails?EventId=74052&backTo=Calendar&startDate=2021/03/01.
  • Creating Meaning from this Moment
    Presentation by Grace Hope, the PNW Regional organizer with 350.org. What does it mean to be an organizer for climate justice during a pandemic, the uprising for black lives, unprecedented wildfire smoke, and political crises? Global climate chaos is a threat multiplier deeply linked to systems of racial violence and oppression, and calls on each of us to step into meaningful action today.
    Date: Friday, March 19, 2021
    Time: 12:00 pm
    Location: Via Zoom, register at https://www.gonzaga.edu/news-events/events/2021/3/19/creating-meaning-from-this-moment.
    Cost: Free
    For more information visit the above website. Hosted by Gonzaga University Environmental Studies,
  • She Traveled Solo: Strong Women in the Early 20th Century
    See description at the Tuesday, March 2, 2021 event at 4:00 pm.
    Date: Thursday, March 19, 2021
    Time: 2:00 pm
    Location: On-line, visit side for Zoom link.
    Cost: Free, must register at https://events.spokanelibrary.org/event/4883846
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-she-traveled-solo-strong-women-in-the-early-20th-century-8/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Narrows Glen.
  • Heating Up: The Ethics of Climate Change
    What if we could tell ourselves a new story about climate change — and, in doing so, alter our relationship to our planet? Ethicist Brian G. Henning discusses how global warming itself is not the only problem—it’s a symptom of a larger issue concerning how we conceive of ourselves and our relationship to the natural world. Brian G. Henning is a professor of Philosophy and Environmental Studies at Gonzaga University and has earned a PhD in philosophy.
    Dates: Saturday, March 20 2021
    Time: 9:30 am
    Location: On-line registration at https://gonzaga.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwocOmpqDsiHdIo9CLIhdFS9FtrQe8QO7B3
    Cost: Free
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-heating-up-the-ethics-of-climate-change-10/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by American Association of University Women.
  • What’s Age Got To with It?
    “You look good for your age.” “You’re too young to understand.”
    In employment decisions, family discussions, medical care, and even in birthday cards, assumptions about being “over the hill” or “a lazy kid” are common. What do you wish society would stop saying about your generation? How can we talk about age and aging in a more positive, affirming way? In this interactive and fun talk, Dori Gillam welcomes individuals from every generation to explore how we can begin valuing all ages—including our own.
    Dori Gillam has researched and spoken on ageism and aging for over 30 years.
    Date: Saturday, March 20, 2021
    Time: 1:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, registration info to come
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-whats-age-got-to-do-with-it-4/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Friends of Third Place Commons.
  • Considering Matthew Shepard
    Preformed by Gonzaga Chamber Chorus Gonzaga’s Chamber Chorus presents this moving story about Matthew Shepard, told in a new staged musical production by Craig Hella Johnson. Considering Matthew Shepard takes us on a journey of Matt’s story with music ranging from Bach to musical theatre, from country to soul. The music invites us to come together as a community and to increase our empathy for one another.
    Date: Sunday, March 21, 2021
    Time: 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
    Location: Live-streamed from the Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center https://gonzaga.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_C2UdykbmSPCmqOcqTwk_Kg.
    Cost: Free and open to the public, donations accepted.
    For more information visit https://www.gonzaga.edu/news-events/events/2021/3/21/considering-matthew-shepard or email music@gonzaga.edu.
  • Women Activists and the Legacy of Progressivism
    A lecture by Veta Schlimgen, Department of History, Gonzaga University. This lecture is part of 19th & Counting: From Suffrage to Solidarity, Gonzaga’s celebration of the 19th Amendment’s centennial – a chance to reflect on what it took for women to get the right to vote and to advance additional work toward equity for all.
    Date: Tuesday, March 23, 2021
    Time: 7:00 pm- 8:00 pm
    Location: Wolff Auditorium, Jepson Center at Gonzaga University
    Cost: Free and open to the public
    For more information visit https://www.gonzaga.edu/news-events/events/2021/3/23/women-activists-and-the-legacy-of-progressivism.
  • The Country that Fiction Built
    For description, see Wednesday, March 3, 2021, 7:00 pm.
    Date: Wednesday, March 24, 2021
    Time: 7:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register at https://www.anacorteswa.gov/FormCenter/Library-13/March-Event-Registration-183
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-the-country-that-fiction-built-5/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Anacortes Public Library.
  • Storm Warning Historic Weather in the Evergreen State
    Local broadcaster and historian Feliks Banel explores our region’s darkest weather days and most infamous storms. With archival photos, radio, and TV clips, Banel takes us back in time to hear stories of those who survived some of the worst Pacific Northwest weather in recorded history.
    Further, Banel explores how these storms can revive our shared humanity. Frightening weather can bind communities together to share resources, commiserate, and protect each other. Participants are encouraged to share their own memories of how they survive being snowed in, washed out, or left without power in the wake of a big storm—and why we remember those moments for the rest of our lives. Feliks Banel is a writer and producer, and serves as editor of COLUMBIA, the quarterly magazine of the Washington State Historical Society.
    Date: Thursday, March 25, 2021
    Time: 7:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-storm-warning-historic-weather-in-the-evergreen-state-3/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Whatcom County Library.
  • Tangled: Why Your Hair Matters to Society
    See description at the Wednesday, March 3, 2021 event, 10:30 am.
    Date: Sunday, March 28, 2021
    Time: 12:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-tangled-why-your-hair-matters-to-society-5/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Zero Waste Washington.

Save the Date

  • 15th Annual Viva Vino & Brew (Scholarship Fundraiser)
    Date: Saturday, April 17, 2021
    Location: Virtual Event
    Time: 6:00 pm
    Cost: $45.00 HBPA member, $50.00 non-member
    For more information email vvb.hbpa@gmail.com. Visit website for sponsor or purchase table at www.hbpaofspokane.org.
  • YWCA Spokane’s Annual Stand Against Racism
    This year, YWCA Spokane’s courageous conversation will align with YWCA USA’s national theme: From Declarations to Change: Addressing Racism as a Public Health Crisis
    Date: April, 22, 2021

    Time: 5:30pm – 6:30pm
    Location: Online
    Cost: Free
    For more information email SAR@ywcaspokane.org, visit https://ywcaspokane.org/stand-against-racism-2021/
  • 26th Annual Hispanic/Latino Graduate and Young Scholar Recognition Ceremony
    All Hispanic/Latino(a) graduating students from Spokane County high schools and colleges/universities are invited to attend with family members. In addition, Young Scholars, in grades 8-11 with a gpa of 3.00.
    Date: May 13, 2021
    Time: 5:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free
    For more information email hbpaceremony@gmail.com, visit their website at www.hbpaofspokane.org.

If you know of diversity/cultural events open to the public that you would like added to the monthly calendar, please e-mail Yvonne C. Montoya Zamora at yvonnecmz04@gmail.com with event details.

For other general events in Spokane, visit visitspokane.com or spokane7.com.


Radio

KYRS Radio Programs For Your Consideration. To learn more visit www.kyrs.org.

Art Hour
Day: Tuesday
Time: 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Program includes in-depth interviews with local artists, cultural commentary, and announcements for the creative community and their fans. Hosted by Mike and Eric. On KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Can You Queer Me Now?
Day: Tuesday
Time: 4:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Hear voices directly from the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Queer, and Questioning community right here in the Inland Northwest. You will hear more about current events, local groups, and perspectives directly from the queer youth community. Hosted by Ian Sullivan on KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Democracy Now
Day: Monday-Friday
Time: 8:00 am – 9:00 am & 5:00 pm-6:00 pm
A national, daily, independent, award-winning news program hosted by journalists Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez. Pioneering the largest public media collaboration in the U.S. Link www.democracynow.org/. KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Democracy Now! Headlines in Spanish
Date: Saturday
Time: 7:00 am – 8:00 am
Democracy Now! is a national, daily, independent, award-winning news program hosted by journalists Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez on KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM Website: http://www.kyrs.org or www.democracynow.org.

Dragonflies on Thin Air
Day: Sunday
Time: 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
One of the few elementary age children’s radio shows produced by kids for kids in the country. The program is fun and educational for children and adults, and includes a mix of jokes, music, guests, stories, poetry, trivia and more. includes Alice, Elenor C., Lily, Rowan, Sicely, Finn, Eleanor M., Sophia, Aleric and Amara. They all go to Spokane Public Montessori elementary school. KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Irish Music on Tap
Day: Wednesday
Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Music from Ireland, Scotland, and England as well as Celtic Brittany and Canada. Hosted by Don and Rick, on KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Ke Buena.
Spanish language station. Oz 95.7.

Latin Lounge
Day: Monday
Time: 6:00 pm-8:00 pm
A wide spectrum of Latin music. Hosted by “Corazon” on KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Layali Arabia
Day: Monday
Time: 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Arabic songs from a multitude of different genres to come out of the Arab World. Hosted by Rachel on KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org

Queens of Noise
Day: Wednesday
Time: 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm
You will hear best in female vocalists/musicians. Hosted by Luscious Duchess, KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

QueerSounds
Day: Thursday
Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
QueerSounds is a radio show dedicated to playing music by and for LGBTQ people. Music, interviews, community events, and forums. KYRS FM 92.3 or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

The Persian Hour
Day: Saturday
Time: noon – 1:00 pm
The Persian Hour’s consists of a variety of Iranian music from hip hop to traditional, Jazz, blues, rock and roll and the usual. Also, they will share stories, recipes, and interviews. Hosted by Shahrokh, KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Raise Your Voice
Day: Friday
Time: 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
A teenage-run music and current events program. KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org

The Science of Poverty
Day: Saturday
Time: 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Explores the topic of poverty. Hosted by Jesse Quintana, official Facebook site https://www.facebook.com/TheScienceOfPoverty, KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org

SOS-Spokane
Day: Thursday
Time: 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
The show addresses critical issues facing the Inland Northwest via research, in-depth news, information, analysis, and reasoned opinion. Hosted by Paul Potocky. KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org

Sounds of Science
Day: Sunday
Time: 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Lively discussion of what’s happening in the world of science, from how it is affecting our lives to the ways we are shaping it. Hosted by Blake, Amaya, and Adam. KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Two Brown Ladies and a Microphone
Day: Sunday
Time: 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Soul conversations. Life advices. Things that make us think, reflect, cope and ultimately stay the course. Hosted by Duncan & Brown. KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org

Welcome Home
Day: Thursday
Time: 10:00 am – noon
A multi-genre roots based folk show. KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Women’s Media Center Live
Day: Wednesday
Time: noon – 1:00 pm
WMC Live with Robin Morgan tackles today’s hottest topics; whether it be sex, politics, art, humor, religion, culture, or news stories that go unreported, each is engaged regularly, insightfully, and intelligently. KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Workin’ Woman Blues
Day: Sunday
Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Tunes to help you shake the blues out of your hair with a mix of Funk, R&B, Soul and Blues. Hosted by Jukebox Jennie. KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org


Have a library card? Check out Spokane County District Library. They have large digital resources including eBooks/audio books with Overdrive/Libby. With Flipster browse, download and read digital magazines and with hoopla stream popular movies, music, audiobooks, eBooks, comics and tv shows along, with many other online services. They offer curb side pickup and yes, you can still request a library card.

If you have a library card to Spokane Public Library, they also have a large digital Library resources including eBooks/audio books with Overdrive/Libby. Along with hoopla, Kanopy (movies and tv) and RBDigital (magazines) and other online resources. They also offer curb side pickup and yes, you can still request a library card.


February 2021 International/National Cultural Celebrations Calendar

  • March 1
    • Martenitza – Bulgaria, Romania
      Bulgarians celebrate spring by exchanging red-and-white yarn designs to symbolize health. They wear the yarn designs on their clothing until they see a stork or a blossoming tree. They wear the yarn designs n their clothing until they see a stock or a blossoming tree.
    • St. David’s Day – Wales
      Celebrates Saint David, or known as Dewi Sant in Welsh, the patron saint of Wales who died on this day.
    • Chalanda Marz – Switzerland
      Children go from door to door singing and receive sweets in return.
    • Independence Day – Bosnia & Hetzegovina
      Yearly celebration of their independence from the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in 1992.
    • Alá – Bahá’Í
      19-day fast begins through March 19. The nineteenth and final month in the Baha’i calendar and the time of the 19-day fast in preparation of their new year, Now Ruz. The English translation of Alá (Arabic) is loftiness.
  • Mach 5
    • World Day of Prayer – International
      Held on the first Friday of March, the World Day of Prayer is a movement of Christian women of many traditions who came together in 1927 to observe a common day of prayer each year. A movement initiated and carried out in more than 170 countries and regions bringing together women of various races, cultures and traditions in closer fellowship, understanding and action throughout the year.
  • March 6
    • Independence Day – Ghana
      Commemorates the date in 1957 when the Gold Coast became an independent member of the British Commonwealth.
    • Waitangi Day – New Zealand
      This day commemorates the signing of a treaty at Waitangi on 6th February 1840 by a group of Maori chiefs and the British Government. It honors the rights of the British Crown and also the rights of the Maori people which are now in the process of begin reclaimed.
  • March 8
    • International Women’s Day – UN
      Marks the 1857 revolt of women in New York City protesting conditions in the U.S. textile and garment industries. It acknowledges the contributions made by working women. The theme for 2021 International Women’s Day, is “Choose to Challenge” https://www.internationalwomensday.com/Theme.
  • March 11
    • Shivrati – Hindu
      On Shiva’s night, the Hindu deity Lord Shiva performed the Tandav, the cosmic dance of creation and destruction. A 24-hour fast is kept and devotees make pilgrimages to major shrines for worship.
  • March 12
    • Girl Scout Day – USA, Canada
      Juliette ‘Daisy’ Gordon Low assembled 18 girls from Savannah, Georgia on March 12, 1912, for a local Girl Scout meeting. She believed that all girls should be given the opportunity to develop physically, mentally, and spiritually – with the goal of bringing girls out of isolated home environments and into community.
    • National Day – Mauritius
      Celebrates the day of independence from the UK in 1968.
  • March 14
    • Daylight Savings Time Begins -USA
      The practice of advancing clocks in 48 of the USA states during summer months (mid-March-early November) so that evening daylight lasts longer. This act does sacrifice normal sunrise times.
    • Mothering Sunday – UK, Ireland
      The UK celebrates motherhood and takes place the fourth Sunday of Lent. Traditionally, children bring gifts of flowers and chocolates to their mothers. It originated with the Victorian practice of allowing servants to return home to visit their mothers on this day.
  • March 15
    • Memorial Day – Hungary
      Commemorates the 1848 day of movement toward independence from the Austrian Empire.
    • Clean Monday (Great Lent Begins)-Christian-Coptic, Eastern Orthodox
      It is the beginning of the forty-day fast when Christians imitate Jesus’ withdrawal into the wilderness before his crucifixion.
  • March 16
    • Gahambar Hamaspathmaedem (March 16-20) – Zoroastrian
      This day celebrates the creation of human beings.
  • March 17
    • St. Patrick’s Day – N. Ireland/Ireland/USA
      Commemorates the patron saint of Ireland, who converted the island to Christianity in 432 AD. Tradition says that St. Patrick died on this date in 461 AD. He used the three-leaved shamrock to explain the Christian idea of the Holy Trinity, thus the idea of wearing a shamrock.
  • March 18
    • Flag Day – Aruba
      The flag of Aruba was officially adopted on March 18, 1976, along with the official anthem.
  • March 19
    • St. Joseph’s Day – Christian
      Celebrated throughout most of Italy and by the Italian communities in North America. He was the foster father of Jesus and is the universal patron of the Catholic Church. According to legend, when a severe drought struck western Sicily in the Middle Ages, the people of that area prayed to St. Joseph, asking him to intercede for them and send rain. Their prayers were granted and since then they honor St. Joseph by helping the needy in their community.
  • March 20
    • Spring Equinox – International
      In the Northern Hemisphere, spring begins today with the vernal equinox. In the Southern Hemisphere, today is the beginning of autumn. The daylight length is virtually the same everywhere today – 12 hours, 8 minutes.
    • Eostre – Wicca
      A fertility festival celebrating the birth of Spring. The word Easter is derived from the maiden goddess. Celebrations including lighting fires at sunrise, ringing bells, and decorating hard-boiled eggs, an ancient Pagan custom associated with the goddess.
    • Shunki-Sorei-Sai – Shinto
      Ancestors are given reverence at home altars and considered active members of the living family. Gravesites are cleaned and purified.
    • Shunbun no Hi – Japan
      During the time of the Spring Equinox, Buddhists meditate on the harmony in the universe.
    • Poutuerangi – Aboriginal/Maori, New Zealand
      From Aboriginal roots of the Maori in New Zealand Poutuerangi is celebrated. This is Fall season and Autumn Equinox in the Maori calendar when they harvest crops. Great feasting and celebrating go on this time of year.
    • Independence Day – Tunisia
      Celebrates the day in 1956 when the country was formally recognized as independent from France.
    • Day of the Francophone
      Celebrates the French language and Francophone culture.
  • March 21
    • International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination – UN
      A day to promote efforts to eradicate racial discrimination worldwide and also to remember the killing of 69 protesters against injustice in Sharpeville, South Africa in 1960.
    • Harmony Day – Australia
      Harmony Day, which began in 1999, occurs on 21 March each year and celebrates Australia’s success as a diverse society united by a common set of values.
    • Now Ruz (New Year) – Afghanistan, Iran, Bahá’Í, Islam, Ismaili, Zoroastrain
      Nowruz means “New Day” and is the traditional celebration of the ancient Persian New year. Persians (Iranians, Afghans and Tajiks) and other Indo-Iranian groups (Kurds, Armenians, Azarbaijanis and Balochs) start preparing for the Nowruz with a major spring-cleaning of their house and the purchase of new clothes to wear for the new year. They visit the elders of their family, then the rest of their family and finally their friends. On the thirteenth day families leave their homes and picnic outdoors.
  • March 22
    • Emancipation Day – Puerto Rico
      Commemorates the abolition of slavery in 1873.
    • World Water Day – UN
      Each year, World Water Day highlights a specific aspect of fresh water. It provides an important opportunity to consolidate and build upon previous World Water Days to highlight the two-way relationship between water and the work agenda in the quest for sustainable development.
  • March 23
    • World Meteorological Day – UN
      Commemorates the 1950 day of the convention that created the World Meteorological Organization.
  • March 25
    • Feast of the Annunciation – Christian
      Nine months before Christmas, The Archangel Gabriel came to Mary of Nazareth and told her she would bear the Son of God, Jesus Christ.
    • Evangelismou – Greece
      The Greeks combined the national Independence Day with the Annunciation and what was earlier believed to be the spring equinox. Greeks wear traditional clothes and celebrate with speeches and folk dancing.
  • March 26
    • Birth of Prophet Zarathustra (Fasli) – Zoroastrian
      Zarathushtra (Zoroaster in Greek; Zarhosht in India and Persia) is the founder of the Zoroastrian religion dating back to sometime between 1500 and 1000 BC. He lived in Persia, modern day Iran.
    • Independence Day – Bangladesh
      Commemorates the independence of Bangladesh in 1971.
    • Kuhio Day – Hawai’i
      A state holiday, it celebrates Prince Kuhio birthday in 1871. Prince Kuhio is remembered for actively promoting Hawaiian culture and getting Congress to pass the 1920 Hawaiian Homes Act, providing homesteads for native Hawaiians.
  • March 28
    • Holi Sikh – Hindu
      According to myth, a tyrannical king’s son, PraHlad, refused to worship his father as God and was condemned to death by burning. However, the boy’s aunt, named Holika, transferred her own immunity from fire to Prahlad, and burned to death in his place. This festival of color celebrates Spring, where people play with liquid and powdered colors, light bonfires and blow horns to celebrate the destruction of Holika.
    • Pesach/Passover – Jewish
      Begins previous sundown at 6pm, Pesach lasts for eight years. This time commemorates the Exodus of the Israelites from Egypt. It begins with the ritual meal ‘Seder’ when no leavened bread is consumed with special prayers and symbolic foods.
    • Palm Sunday – Christian
      Jesus rode into Jerusalem on a donkey and was cheered by crowds who strew palm branches in his path. It is observed by worship services and parades using palm branches.
  • March 29
    • Hola Mohalla (Bikarami) – Sikh
      Mock battles are fought and martial arts are displayed in honor of Guru Gobind Sing, who took to armed struggle against tyranny.

Source: The majority of the Diversity/Cultural Celebrations with permission are from Creative Cultural Communications 2021 Diversity Calendar.


Thank you again to Yvonne C. Montoya Zamora for providing this list of diversity/cultural events. If you know of a diversity/cultural event open to the public that you would like added to this diversity monthly calendar, please e-mail Yvonne C. Montoya Zamora at yvonnecmz04@gmail.com with event details. Thank you!


Women’s History Month

Check out this book list by the Spokane Public Library for Kids and Young Adults!

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View Book List

Women at Work

National Women’s History Month’s roots go back to March 8, 1857, when women from New York City factories staged a protest over working conditions. International Women’s Day was first observed in 1909, but it wasn’t until 1981 that Congress established National Women’s History Week during the second week of March. In 1987, Congress expanded the week to a month. Every year since, Congress has passed a resolution for Women’s History Month, and the president has issued a proclamation. Below are a few statistics from the Department of Labor’s website: https://www.dol.gov/agencies/wb/data/occupations-decades-100

Women have been in the work force for more than 100 years, but in honor of the 100th Anniversary of the Women’s Bureau, below are the top 10 occupations women have held in each decade since 1920. This data also includes the number of women in the labor force in each decade, and the percentage of women in the top 10 occupations.

The top ten occupations employing the largest number of women in 1920 are below. There were 8,179,017 women in the labor force comprising of 20.3% of the entire work force which comprised of 52.8% of women.

  1. Other domestic and personal service – 669,491 employed women in this occupation
  2. Teachers – 622,877
  3. Stenographer and typists – 567,784
  4. Clerks (n.e.c.) – 442,753
  5. Farm Labors – 396,625
  6. Launderers and laundresses – 384,083
  7. Saleswomen – 350,552
  8. Bookkeepers and cashiers – 337,418
  9. Cooks – 266,801
  10. Farmers, general farms – 240,385

The top ten occupations employing the largest number of women in 1930 are below. There were 10,500,803 women in the labor force comprising 21.9% of the entire labor force which comprised of 66.2% of women in these occupations.

  1. Operatives (n.e.c.) – 1,386,515 employed women in this occupation
  2. Other domestic and personal service – 1,056,567
  3. Teachers – 834,686
  4. Stenographer and typists – 720,533
  5. Clerks (n.e.c.) – 623,131
  6. Saleswomen – 494,337
  7. Bookkeepers and cashiers – 435,255
  8. Farmer laborers, unpaid family workers – 363,806
  9. Cooks – 341,186
  10. Launderers and laundresses – 330,241

The top ten occupations employing the largest number of women in 1940 are below. There were 12,812,181 women in the labor force comprising 24.4% of the entire labor force which comprised of 67.9% of women in these occupations.

  1. Operatives (n.e.c.) – 1,848,824 employed women in this occupation
  2. Private household workers (n.e.c.) – 1,430,286
  3. Stenographer, typists and secretaries – 1,022,543
  4. Teachers – 783,205
  5. Clerks (n.e.c.) – 687,893
  6. Saleswomen – 520,291
  7. Bookkeepers, accountants, and cashiers – 443,570
  8. Waitresses – 360,424
  9. Proprietors, mangers, and officials (n.e.c.) – 339,282
  10. Housekeepers, private family – 330,497

The top ten occupations employing the largest number of women in 1950 are below. There were 16,663,485 women in the labor force comprising 27.4% of the entire labor force which comprised of 69.8% of women in these occupations.

  1. Operatives (n.e.c.) – 2,461,939 employed women in this occupation
  2. Stenographer. secretaries, and typists – 1,558,546
  3. Clerks (n.e.c.) – 1,508,694
  4. Saleswomen and sales clerks – 1,284,339
  5. Private household workers (n.e.c.) – 1,140,029
  6. Teachers – 867,229
  7. Nurses – 604,329
  8. Bookkeepers – 584,381
  9. Waitresses – 568,036
  10. Mangers, officials and proprietors (n.e.c.) – 558,545

The top ten occupations employing the largest number of women in 1960 are below. There were 22,226,500 women in the labor force comprising 32.2% of the entire labor force which comprised of 56.1% of women in these occupations.

  1. Clerks (n.e.c.) – 1,725,420 employed women in this occupation
  2. Saleswomen and sales clerks – 1,492,980
  3. Secretaries – 1,423,660
  4. Operatives (n.e.c.) – 1,323,320
  5. Private household workers (n.e.c.) – 1,146,260
  6. Teachers – 1,106,800
  7. Nurses – 1,106,800
  8. Bookkeepers – 766,040
  9. Waitresses – 709,220
  10. Mangers, officials and proprietors (n.e.c.) – 619,980

The top ten occupations employing the largest number of women in 1970 are below. There were 30,688,800 women in the labor force comprising 37.5% of the entire labor force which comprised of 42.1% of women in these occupations.

  1. Secretaries – 2,625,600 employed women in this occupation
  2. Teachers – 1,823,800
  3. Sales clerks, retail – 1,446,900
  4. Bookkeepers – 1,265,400
  5. Nurses – 1,042,800
  6. Waiters – 931,000
  7. Typists – 915,800
  8. Sewers and stitchers – 811,300
  9. Cashiers – 667,800
  10. Maids, private households – 660,500

The top ten occupations employing the largest number of women in 1980 are below. There were 44,649,840 women in the labor force comprising 42.2% of the entire labor force which comprised of 41.1% of women in these occupations.

  1. Secretaries – 3,820,700 employed women in this occupation
  2. Teachers – 2,398,240
  3. Bookkeepers, accounting, and auditing clerks – 1,635,320
  4. Nurses – 1,628,020
  5. Cashiers – 1,426,940
  6. Managers and administrators (n.e.c.) – 1,352,680
  7. General office clerks – 1,350,780
  8. Waiters and waitresses – 1,194,800
  9. Sales workers (n.e.c.) – 1,150,240
  10. Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants – 1,136,960

The top ten occupations employing the largest number of women in 1990 are below. There were 56,553,832 women in the labor force comprising 45.3% of the entire labor force which comprised of 36.3% of women in these occupations.

  1. Secretaries – 3,823,250 employed women in this occupation
  2. Teachers – 2,987,327
  3. Nurses – 2,148,271
  4. Cashiers – 1,993,017
  5. Bookkeepers, accounting, and auditing clerks – 1,656,513
  6. Managers and administrators (n.e.c.) – 1,615,184
  7. Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants – 1,497,257
  8. General office clerks – 1,158,162
  9. Supervisors and proprietors, sales occupations – 1,157,845
  10. Sales workers (n.e.c.) – 1,148,866

The top ten occupations employing the largest number of women in 2000 are below. There were 64,553,954 women in the labor force comprising 46.5% of the entire labor force which comprised of 33.6% of women in these occupations.

  1. Secretaries and administrative assistants – 3,597,416 employed women in this occupation
  2. Teachers – 3,466,434
  3. Nurses – 2,602,376
  4. Cashiers – 2,028,267
  5. Retail salespersons – 1,780,975
  6. Bookkeepers, accounting, and auditing clerks – 1,523,026
  7. Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants – 1,465,386
  8. Customer service representatives – 1,396,909
  9. Childcare workers – 1,254,406
  10. Waiters and waitresses – 1,235,786

The top ten occupations employing the largest number of women in 2010 are below. There were 74,279,640 women in the labor force comprising 47.3% of the entire labor force which comprised of 33.3% of women in these occupations.

  1. Teachers – 3,984,836 employed women in this occupation
  2. Secretaries – 3,139,854
  3. Nurses – 3,926,489
  4. Cashiers – 2,410, 41
  5. Nursing, psychiatric, and home health aides – 1,926,489
  6. Retail salespersons – 1,735,213
  7. Customer service representatives – 1,504,923
  8. Waiters and waitresses – 1,480,519
  9. First-line supervisors of retail sales workers – 1,309,252
  10. Maids and housekeeping cleaners – 1,269,181

The top ten occupations employing the largest number of women in 2018 are below. There were 78,607,961 women in the labor force comprising 47.3% of the entire labor force which comprised of 32.8% of women in these occupations.

  1. Teachers – 4,239,366 employed women in this occupation
  2. Nurses – 3,910,538
  3. Nursing, psychiatric, and home health aides – 2,965,314
  4. Secretaries and administrative assistants – 2,745,575
  5. Cashiers – 2,419,322
  6. Customer service representatives – 2,083,533
  7. Retail salesperson – 1,680,220
  8. Waiters and waitresses – 1,571,530
  9. First-line supervisors of retail sales workers – 1,468,669
  10. Managers (n.e.c.) – 1,428,557

Notes: Occupation estimates include women ages 16 and over in the labor force (1920) and civilian employed women ages 16 and over (1930-2018). Labor force estimates include all women ages 16 and over who are employed or unemployed. The classification of occupations changes every 10 years. As a result, some occupations increase or decline in size as a result of being combined or split out from other occupations. Individual occupation categories are not strictly comparable over time. The occupations presented are the top 10 occupations in the decade they occurred. “Operatives, n.e.c.” were primarily employed in manufacturing jobs. “n.e.c.” means “not elsewhere classified”. Data: 1920-2000 Decennial Census and 2010 and 2018 American Community Survey public use microdata files
From https://www.dol.gov/agencies/wb/data/occupations-decades-100