Community Cultural & Diversity Calendar

Stay in the know about what’s happening around Spokane!
Stop here to find family-friendly, educational, or racial & social justice oriented events going on in or around the area.


The Black Lens

The Black Lens is an independent community publication focused on the news, events, people, issues, and information of importance to the Black community. Sandra Williams is the editor and publisher with a long history of anti-oppression work. She was a founding member of Spokane Community Against Racism (SCAR) and a long time member of the Spokane NAACP.

Learn more about The Black Lens, how to support the paper, and read back issues at blacklensnews.com.

October  Issue


Events In Spokane – October 2021

The below list of Spokane area diversity/cultural events and activities were compiled and provided by Yvonne C. Montoya Zamora. If you know of a diversity/cultural event open to the public that you would like added to this diversity monthly calendar, please e-mail Yvonne C. Montoya Zamora at yvonnecmz04@gmail.com with event details. Thank you!

PRINT Calendar


Local Events In Spokane This October

  • Hidden Histories: The South Vietnamese Side of the Vietnam War
    The Vietnam War is seen by much of the Western world as being fought between the Americans and North Vietnamese Communists, with the South Vietnamese largely absent. Yet many Vietnamese refugees who came to America after the war served in the South Vietnamese military, and there is little recognition and understanding of their contributions and role in the war. In fact, in American and Vietnamese Communist histories, the South Vietnamese are painted as corrupt, apathetic sidekicks to the Americans.
    How did the South Vietnamese military really experience the Vietnam War?
    Historian Julie Pham draws from interviews she conducted with 40 South Vietnamese military veterans in the United States, and illuminates how people can remember historical events differently.
    Julie Pham (she/her) is the CEO of CuriosityBased, a consulting practice focused on fostering curiosity in the workplace. Her family owns Northwest Vietnamese News. She published Their War: The Perspectives of the South Vietnamese Military in the Words of Veteran-Emigres in 2019. She earned her PhD in history from the University of Cambridge as a Gates Cambridge Scholar. Pham lives in Seattle.
    Date: Thursday, September 2, 2021
    Time: 7:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register, see below
    For more information and to register, https://www.humanities.org/event/online-hidden-histories-the-south-vietnamese-side-of-the-vietnam-war/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Cowlitz County Historical Museum.
  • Hispanic Business/Professional Association (HBPA) Cafésito Night
    Join us as we celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month. An evening of Lotería, art and amazing pan Dulcé with Miguel Gonzales (HBPA President, and artists in residence) and Fernanda Mazcot.
    Date: Friday, October 1, 2021
    Time: 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
    Location: The Hive, 2904 E Sprague
    Cost: Free and open to the public
    For more information visit www.facebook.com/HBPASPOKANE.
  • Community Health and Wellness Fair
    Representatives from more than 40 businesses, agencies and organizations will provide information on healthy living, living and future planning options, recreational activities, financial and legal choices, health insurance alternatives, home health care, health screenings, senior living choices, medical needs and much more. WSU Nursing Students will also perform vitals screenings and Walgreens will offer flu shots from 9-11 a.m.
    Date: Saturday, October 2, 2021
    Time: 9:00 am – 2:00 pm
    Location: Southside Community Center, 3151 27th Ave
    Cost: Free and open to the public
    For more information call 509.535.0803 or visit their website at http://www.southsidescc.org/. Attendees can
    enter to win cash prizes of $150, $85 and $50.
  • 2021 Spokane Coalition of Color (SCOC) Candidate Forum – Spokane Municipal Judges and School Board
    SCOC believes elected leaders in Spokane and Spokane Valley should prioritize the values and needs of communities of color. This forum will give people a chance to highlight their top concerns and hopes for our future.
    Date: Saturday, October 2, 2021
    Time: 10:00 am – noon
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register, see below.
    For more information and to register visit https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ytQsPMtOSfujJyHeW5l1Nw. Sponsored by Spokane Coalition of Color (APIC Spokane, HBPA, NAACP and MCAS)

  • Downtown Fall Fest and Fall Fest Artist Fair
    Featuring sing-alongs, magic shows, dance performances, a petting zoo, face painting, an Oktoberfest celebration with beer, pretzels and house made, fermented mustard, a themed wine tasting and more.
    In addition, the Artist Fair with local artists and artisans will be showing and selling their work, including paintings, photography, prints, cards, wearable, ceramics, jewelry and more. Get a head start on your holiday shopping.
    Dates: Saturday/Sunday, October 2-3, 2021
    Time: 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
    Location: Downtown Spokane (River Park Square, Wall Street, Riverfront Park, Parkada Plaza) Artist Fair will be held at the Pavilion (outside and in-door booths)
    Cost: Free and open to the public
    For more information visit https://downtownspokane.org/event/48701/2021-10-02/. Due to COVID. attendees
    are asked to observe public safety measures, masks will be required for all inside activities and in congested
    outdoor spaces.

  • Partnering for Progress into Africa Virtual Auction
    Bid on nearly 100 items in a silent and live auction, with high-value items auction on October from 7:00pm – 8:00 pm. Proceeds benefit Partnering for Progress.
    Dates: Saturday/Sunday, October 4-10, 2021
    Time: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
    Location: Virtual
    Cost: Free, open to the public. Register or view the catalogue at charityauction.bid/P4PAuction2021.
    For more information visit http://www.partneringforprogress.org.

  • How Latina/Latino Representation Can Improve Democracy
    Latinas/Latinos, the largest ethno-racial group in Washington State and in the nation, are grossly
    underrepresented in powerful segments of society, contributing to what some scholars refer to as a “demographic divide.” While the United States is an increasingly diverse society, this diversity is not reflected in important spheres of influence and power. In just one example, Latinas/Latinos represent just two percent of full-time faculty at degree-granting institutions, yet Latina/Latino students are the fastest growing demographic on college campuses. What needs to be done to increase academic representation?
    Drawing from interviews, policy analysis, and personal experience, Professor Maria Chávez investigates the
    obstacles contributing to this underrepresentation and explores ideas for how to move toward a more inclusive
    society and a healthier multiracial democracy.
    Maria Chávez (she/her) is a professor of political science at Pacific Lutheran University specializing in American government, public policy, and race and politics. As a first-generation college graduate herself, her work centers on the progress and barriers of Latinas/Latinos in the United States. Chávez lives in Lacey.
    Date: Wednesday, October 5, 2021
    Time: 6:30 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register, see below.
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-how-latina-latino-representation-can-improve-democracy/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Lake Stevens Library.
  • How Audio Technology Changes the World
    Although we live in a visual world, audio still has the power to create intimacy and spark the imagination like no other medium can. Veteran broadcaster Ross Reynolds explores the impact that audio transmission has had on society and storytelling, beginning with the first century of radio up to the modern age of audiobooks, internet streaming, podcasts, and smart speakers. How has audio transmission changed society, and what makes it such a still powerful form of communication?
    Attendees will be encouraged to share stories of their formative audio experiences, and local radio broadcasters and podcasters will be invited to share their stories. Ross Reynolds (he/him) is KUOW’s executive producer for community engagement, before which he was a program host for 16 years.
    Reynolds lives in Seattle.
    Date: Wednesday, October 5, 2021
    Time: 6:30 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register, see below.
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-how-audio-technology-changed-the-world-6/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/ Hosted by Tacoma Public Library.
  • Diamonds in the Rough: The Gentrification of Rural Washington
    Washington’s rural communities are rapidly changing. Formerly reliant on working-class industries like mining, oil, and agriculture, an influx of wealthy amenities, outdoor recreation, and cultural activities. But in doing so, these newcomers are causing new inequalities.
    Jennifer Sherman, professor of sociology, will discuss both the glaring and the hidden effects of rural gentrification. Through the lens of a rural Washington community, Sherman explains how “class blindness” protects those with more privilege from fully recognizing social class inequalities. She advocates for the importance of getting to know the neighbors who are least like us so that we can minimize destructive social divides together.
    Jennifer Sherman (she/her) is a professor of sociology at Washington State University. Her qualitative research focuses on poverty and inequality, mainly in the rural Northwest. Sherman lives in Moscow, ID.
    Date: Wednesday, October 5, 2021
    Time: 7:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register, see below.
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-diamonds-in-the-rough-the-gentrification-of-rural-washington/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/ Hosted by Whatcom County Library.
  • Bystander Intervention Training
    Join Dr. Pui-Yan Lam for an interactive workshop providing an historical context to the rise of anti-Asian racism and introducing the 5-Ds approach to step up and intervene safely in cases of anti-Asian / Asian American harassment.
    Date: Wednesday, October 6, 2021
    Time: 10:00 am-noon
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register, see below.
    For more information contact Lisa Curtis at 509.838.6581 or lisac@unitedwayspokane.org. To register visit
    Bystander Intervention Training – LIVE UNITED (constantcontact.com). Sponsored by United Way/Excelerate
    Success.
  • YWCA DVAM Chalk Walk
    Help YWCA Spokane kickoff Domestic Violence Action Month (DVAM) by joining them for their Chalk
    Walk event in partnership with Riverfront Spokane. We will cover the sidewalks in Riverfront Park with
    awareness, affirmations, and reflections.
    Date: Wednesday, October 6, 2021
    Time: noon – 3:00 pm
    Location: Riverfront Park
    Cost: Free
    For more information visit https://ywcaspokane.org/dvam/ or call 509.789.9305.
  • Why Deny Science?
    Have you ever had a conversation with someone who denies a scientific finding? Perhaps that conversation was about something as big as climate change or something as small as the health effects of eating chocolate. But in most cases, there is a pattern to how people argue against scientific findings, no matter the scope of the issue at hand.
    In this talk, philosopher Michael Goldsby sorts through the tactics and reasons many people use to argue against scientific claims. Though science is far from perfect, science denialism can have far- reaching impacts, especially in an era of critical issues like global warming and vaccines. Discover how to discuss scientific issues without being dismissive and learn about the richer discussions one can have when science, philosophy, and logic intersect.
    Michael Goldsby (he/him) is an associate professor of philosophy in the School of Politics, Philosophy, and Public Affairs at Washington State University. Goldsby lives in Pullman.
    Date: Thursday, October 6, 2021
    Time: 5:30 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register, see below.
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-why-deny-science-3/.
    Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Tenino Timberland Library.
  • The River That Made Seattle
    Once teeming with bountiful salmon and fertile plains, Seattle’s Duwamish River drew both Native peoples and
    settlers to its shores over centuries for trading, transport, and sustenance. Unfortunately, the very utility of the
    river was its undoing, as decades of dumping led to the river being declared a Superfund cleanup site.
    Much of Washington’s history has been told through the perspective of its colonizers, obscuring and mythologizing the changes to these lands that have long been occupied by Native peoples. Through the story of the river, author BJ Cummings explores previously unrecorded Native and immigrant histories, and exposes settler falsehoods about the founding of the state. The river’s story is a call to action to align future decisions with values of collaboration, respect, and justice.
    BJ Cummings (she/her) founded the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition and manages community engagement for the University of Washington’s Superfund Research Program. She is the author of The River That Made Seattle: A Natural and Human History of the Duwamish, and she was awarded the River Network’s national River Hero award for her work leading community-based clean up and restoration of the Duwamish River. Cummings lives in Seattle.
    Date: Wednesday, October 6, 2021
    Time: 6:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register, see below
    For more information and to register, https://www.humanities.org/event/online-the-river-that-made-seattle-3/.
    Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Everett Public Library.
  • 2021 Spokane Candidates Climate Change Forum
    What do local candidates for office think about climate change? How will it affect your vote in November? Forum moderator Dr. Brian G. Henning, Director, Gonzaga Climate Center. All Spokane City Council and Spokane School Board candidates have been invited.
    Date: Wednesday, October 6, 2021
    Time: 6:30 pm
    Location: Cataldo Hall, The Globe Room, Gonzaga University
    Cost: Free, must register, see below.
    For more information and to register visit https://www.gonzaga.edu/center-for-climate-society-environment/events/spokane-candidates-climate-change-forum.
  • Eric Horsted, Black-ish Writer
    Join EWU for a campus conversation with Eric Horsted, a 9-time Emmy nominated TV writer and producer.
    Date: Thursday, October 7, 2021
    Time: noon-1:00 pm6:30 pm
    Location: Showalter Auditorium, Eastern WA University, Cheney
    Cost: Free open to the public.
    For more information contact Marilyn at mdreis@ewu.edu. Sponsored by The Office for Diversity, Equity &
    Inclusion.
  • 2021 Social Justice Film Festival. ACTIVATE | REFUGE
    Features a competitive, curated selection of short and feature films that highlight many of today’s key struggles. Taken together, the genre-spanning films ask how we activate and create refuge in response to crisis.
    Date: Thursday-Sunday, October 7-17, 2021
    Location: On-line
    Cost: All film tickets and festival passes are available on a sliding scale. Film tickets are available for between $5 and $25. Festival passes are available for between $75 and $125.
    Passes and tickets available at https://sjff2021.eventive.org/welcome.
    For more information about the films, visit https://socialjusticefilminstitute.org/sjff2021.
    Presented by the Social Justice Film Institute, Northwest Film Forum, and the Meaningful Movies Project, the Festival is a virtual celebration of the power of people and film to push for change within their homes and communities.
  • Humanities Washington Bedtime Stories Virtual Fundraiser
    Charles Johnson, Tiffany Midge, and Jess Walter will read their own light-hearted takes on an otherwise dark year. These stories are compelling, sweet, and quite often funny. But don’t take our word for it – get registered and listen for yourself.
    Date: Friday, October 8, 2021
    Time: 6:00 pm
    Location: Virtual
    Cost: Free to listen, must register, see below.
    For more information and to register, visit https://e.givesmart.com/events/mxO.
  • 1st Annual Big Gay Dance Party
    Performers, drink and food specials, lots of neon and glitter, body painting, Drag and more.
    Date: Friday, October 8, 2021
    Time: Doors open at 8:00 pm – 2:00 am
    Location: NYNE Bar and Bistro, 232 W Sprague Ave
    Cost: Free
    Proceeds benefit Spokane AIDS Network (SAN).
  • 2021 Spokane Coalition of Color (SCOC) Candidate Forum – Spokane Valley City Council
    SCOC believes elected leaders in Spokane and Spokane Valley should prioritize the values and needs of communities of color. This forum will give people a chance to highlight their top concerns and hopes for our future.
    Date: Saturday, October 9, 2021
    Time: 10:00 am – noon
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register, see below.
    For more information and to register visit https://www.facebook.com/SpokaneCoalitionOfColor/events.
    Sponsored by Spokane Coalition of Color (APIC Spokane, HBPA, NAACP and MCAS)
  • National Faith & Blue Weekend
    Join the Spokane Police Department, Spokane Police Chaplin and members of our community to a meet and greet, car show/equipment exhibition and essay contest awards. National Faith & Blue Weekend is a collaborative effort to build bridges and break biases.
    Date: Saturday, October 9, 2021
    Time: 10:00 am – 2:00 pm
    Location: Public Safety Building, 1100 W Mallon Ave, in front of the Law Enforcement Memorial, east side of building.
    Cost: Free
    To learn more, visit www.faithandblue.org.
  • American Democracy’s Indigenous Roots and Future
    History books teach us that the Founding Fathers birthed American democracy, but do not reveal the Indigenous sources of inspiration that guided their vision. The Haudenosaunee Confederacy’s Great Law of Peace—uniting six Nations in an alliance that predates the American Constitution by centuries—served as a powerful example to men such as Benjamin Franklin, who benefited from the political guidance of Haudenosaunee leaders. Franklin directly cited the Law’s influence on the Constitution. But even Franklin did not comprehend the political and spiritual power held by the clan mothers of these matriarchal societies, who were instrumental to building and maintaining a peaceful union.
    Join storyteller Fern Renville as she shares stories both mythic and personal that reframe and highlight the history, present, and future of Indigenous female power and leadership in America. Such stories include the Seneca story of The Peacemaker and the Dakota story of White Buffalo Calf Woman.
    Fern Naomi Renville (she/her) is a Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota, Omaha, and Seneca-Cayuga storyteller, theatre director, and playwright. She is the great-granddaughter of Melinda Cayuga, a Seneca matriarch who exemplified the loving strength of the clan mothers. Renville lives in Washougal.
    Date: Saturday, October 9, 2021
    Time: 1:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register, see belowFor more information and to register, https://www.humanities.org/event/online-american-democracys-
    indigenous-roots-and-future-7/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Museum of Northwest Art.
  • Spokane Pride Drive-Thru Pride Festival & Car Parade
    Experience Spokane’s proudest procession of affirmation and love for our community. Drive through the Spokane Pride Festival at the Spokane Arena Parking Lot featuring our local non-profits, local businesses, Food Trucks thanks to the Great Spokane Food Truck Association, and of course drag queens!
    Date: Saturday, October 9, 2021
    Time: 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
    Location: Spokane Arena Parking Lot, 20 W Mallon Ave.
    Cost: Free
    For more information visit www.spokanepride.org.
  • The River That Made Seattle
    Once teeming with bountiful salmon and fertile plains, Seattle’s Duwamish River drew both Native peoples and
    settlers to its shores over centuries for trading, transport, and sustenance. Unfortunately, the very utility of the
    river was its undoing, as decades of dumping led to the river being declared a Superfund cleanup site.
    Much of Washington’s history has been told through the perspective of its colonizers, obscuring and mythologizing the changes to these lands that have long been occupied by Native peoples. Through the story of the river, author BJ Cummings explores previously unrecorded Native and immigrant histories, and exposes settler falsehoods about the founding of the state. The river’s story is a call to action to align future decisions with values of collaboration, respect, and justice.
    BJ Cummings (she/her) founded the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition and manages community engagement for the University of Washington’s Superfund Research Program. She is the author of The River That Made Seattle: A Natural and Human History of the Duwamish, and she was awarded the River Network’s national River Hero award for her work leading community-based clean up and restoration of the Duwamish River. Cummings lives in Seattle.
    Date: Wednesday, October 13, 2021
    Time: 9:00 am
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register, see below
    For more information and to register, https://www.humanities.org/event/online-the-river-that-made-seattle-4/.
    Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Northwest EcoBuilding Guild.
  • YWCA DVAM Table Talk – Businesses & Leaders Step in Action
    Watch a discussion between Jeanette Hauk (YWCA Spokane CEO) and Annie Murphey (Executive Director of
    the Spokane Regional Domestic Violence Coalition), about the role businesses can and should play in responding to and preventing domestic violence in Spokane.
    Date: Wednesday, October 13, 2021
    Time: all day
    Cost: Free
    For more information visit https://ywcaspokane.org/dvam/ or call 509.789.9305.
  • This is the End: How Movies Prepared Us for the Apocalypse
    Great city streets emptied of people; a population panicked; misinformation in the air. If some of our experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic seemed familiar, it might be because the movies already imagined them. Whether the cause is environmental factors (The Day After Tomorrow, Snowpiercer, Contagion), nuclear disaster (On the Beach), or unexplained doomsday (Midnight Sky, Children of Men), film has explored what it looks like when the “Big One” hits—and how we might react.
    In this talk illustrated with clips, Robert Horton looks at the eerie imagery of apocalyptic movies, and how these films foreshadowed our responses during the pandemic: the extremes of divisiveness and community-building, the loneliness of isolation, and the tantalizing possibility of starting over again—but maybe doing it better this time.
    Robert Horton (he/him), a member of the National Society of Film Critics, was the longtime film reviewer for
    the Seattle Weekly, Everett Herald, and KUOW. He has been a Fulbright specialist, a Smithsonian Journeys speaker, and an instructor at Seattle University and the Architectural Association in London. He now hosts the radio program, The Music and the Movies. Horton lives in Vashon.
    Date: Wednesday, October 13, 2021
    Time: 6:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register
    For more information and to register, https://www.humanities.org/event/online-this-is-the-end-how-movies-prepared-us-for-the-apocalypse-2/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Everett Public Library.
  • A Nicer Kind of Murder: The Evolution of Crime FictionMurder isn’t what it used to be. Explore the shifting role of the victim in detective novels, and how that shift
    reflects broader social changes. From Poe and Sherlock Homes to British cozies and Hardboiled pulps, novelist Matthew Sullivan traces the many influences on the postwar and modern eras of the mystery genre and shows how empathy plays a unique role in contemporary crime novels—especially in today’s literary mysteries.
    What does the way crime victims are portrayed say about a society’s culture? Join Sullivan to reflect on the special relationship between reading literature and experiencing empathy—on the page and in our daily lives.
    Matthew Sullivan (he/him) is currently a writing teacher and is working on a crime novel set in Soap Lake. Sullivan lives in Anacortes.
    Date: Wednesday, October 13, 2021
    Time: 6:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register.
    For more information and to register, https://www.humanities.org/event/online-a-nicer-kind-of-murder-the-evolution-of-crime-fiction-2/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Lakewood Pierce County Library.
  • Hispanic Business / Professional Association Monthly Meeting
    Sabes Que Speaker: TBA
    Date: Wednesday, October 13, 2021
    Time: 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
    Location: Fiesta Mexicana, 1227 S Grand Blvd
    Cost: Free, purchase food items $5.00-$20.00
    For more information visit their website at https://www.hbpaofspokane.org/.
  • Diamonds in the Rough: The Gentrification of Rural Washington
    Washington’s rural communities are rapidly changing. Formerly reliant on working-class industries like mining, oil, and agriculture, an influx of wealthy amenities, outdoor recreation, and cultural activities. But in doing so, these newcomers are causing new inequalities.
    Jennifer Sherman, professor of sociology, will discuss both the glaring and the hidden effects of rural gentrification. Through the lens of a rural Washington community, Sherman explains how “class blindness” protects those with more privilege from fully recognizing social class inequalities. She advocates for the importance of getting to know the neighbors who are least like us so that we can minimize destructive social divides together.
    Jennifer Sherman (she/her) is a professor of sociology at Washington State University. Her qualitative research focuses on poverty and inequality, mainly in the rural Northwest. Sherman lives in Moscow, ID.
    Date: Wednesday, October 13, 2021
    Time: 6:30 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register, see below.
    For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-diamonds-in-the-rough-the-gentrification-of-rural-washington-2/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/ Hosted by Camas Public Library.
  • Transitions – People Who Care Fundraiser
    Celebrating 30 years of community at Women’s Hearth. Keynote by Dr. Anjali Dutt, in addition to alumni stories. Fundraiser for Transitions (programs—Women’s Hearth, Miryam’s House, Transitional Living Center, EduCare, New Leaf Bakery Cafe, and Home Yard Cottages), a non-profit, giving women and their children a second chance.
    Date: Thursday, October 14, 2021
    Time: noon
    Location: Virtual
    Cost: Free,
    For more information visit https://help4women.org/pwc2021. To register to attend virtually, go to
    https://help4women.org/pwc2021. For assistance with registration, please email Sarah at slickfold@help4women.org or call/text 509.994.9580.
  • NAACP Monthly Membership Meeting
    Date: Monday, October 18, 2021
    Time: 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
    Location: Community Building, 35 W Main Ave or community venue, check their Facebook page
    Cost: Free, meeting open to everyone
    For more information contact spokanenaacp@gmail.com or visit their Facebook at
    https://www.facebook.com/spokane.naacp/. Note that this meeting may be virtual, please visit their Facebook for updates.
  • The Rights of Nature: Saving the Planet or Harmful to Humanity
    A moderated debate hosted by Brian G. Henning, director of the Gonzaga center for climate, society and the
    environment and professor of philosophy and environmental studies. Debate between Thomas Linzey, Center for Democratic and Environmental Rights and Wesley J. Smith, Discovery Institute.
    Date: Tuesday, October 19, 2021
    Time: 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
    Location: Virtual – Zoom meeting
    Cost: Free, open to the public
    For more information, visit https://gonzaga.edu/center-for-climate-society-environment. Sponsored by the Center for Climate, Society, and the Environment, Gonzaga University.
  • Diamonds in the Rough: The Gentrification of Rural Washington
    Washington’s rural communities are rapidly changing. Formerly reliant on working-class industries like mining, oil, and agriculture, an influx of wealthy amenities, outdoor recreation, and cultural activities. But in doing so, these newcomers are causing new inequalities.
    Jennifer Sherman, professor of sociology, will discuss both the glaring and the hidden effects of rural gentrification. Through the lens of a rural Washington community, Sherman explains how “class blindness” protects those with more privilege from fully recognizing social class inequalities. She advocates for the importance of getting to know the neighbors who are least like us so that we can minimize destructive social divides together.
    Jennifer Sherman (she/her) is a professor of sociology at Washington State University. Her qualitative research focuses on poverty and inequality, mainly in the rural Northwest. Sherman lives in Moscow, ID.
    Date: Wednesday, October 20, 2021
    Time: 12:00 pm (noon)
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register, see below.For more information and to register, visit https://www.humanities.org/event/online-diamonds-in-the-rough-the-gentrification-of-rural-washington-3/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/ Hosted by WA State Department of Enterprise Services.
  • YWCA DVAM Survive to Thrive – A Survivor Shares Her Story
    Watch the powerful healing journey of a local survivor through this special film release, presented to
    you through our Mission Partner, Hamilton Studio. Her story shifts the focus away from a survivor’s
    endurance and towards their capacity to heal and build a future they deserve, one free from violence.
    Date: Wednesday, October 20, 2021
    Time: all day
    Cost: Free
    For more information visit https://ywcaspokane.org/dvam/ or call 509.789.9305.
  • A Nicer Kind of Murder: The Evolution of Crime Fiction
    Murder isn’t what it used to be. Explore the shifting role of the victim in detective novels, and how that shift
    reflects broader social changes. From Poe and Sherlock Homes to British cozies and Hardboiled pulps, novelist Matthew Sullivan traces the many influences on the postwar and modern eras of the mystery genre and shows how empathy plays a unique role in contemporary crime novels—especially in today’s literary mysteries. What does the way crime victims are portrayed say about a society’s culture?
    Join Sullivan to reflect on the special relationship between reading literature and experiencing empathy—on the page and in our daily lives. Matthew Sullivan (he/him) is currently a writing teacher and is working on a crime novel set in Soap Lake. Sullivan lives in Anacortes.
    Date: Wednesday, October 20, 2021
    Time: 6:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register.
    For more information and to register, https://www.humanities.org/event/in-person-a-nicer-kind-of-murder-the-evolution-of-crime-fiction-3/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Anacortes Public Library.
  • Umoja (Unity): Sustaining African Cultural Arts
    Explore the depth and significance of African culture, from its communal philosophies to its lively song and dance.
    In this interactive talk—part presentation and part performance—artist Afua Kouyaté shares pieces of African
    culture and folkloric traditions like the Nguzo Saba, or “seven principles,” of Kwanzaa, which include values
    like umoja (unity), ujima (collective responsibility), and nia (purpose). Using the seven principles as a framework, Kouyaté tells the story of her life and of Africa’s rich culture to inspire you to root deeper through your own culture. In this talk, infused with cultural artifacts, music, and dance, Kouyaté brings people together through the sharing and celebration of cultural arts and traditions.
    Afua Kouyaté (she/her) is a performing and teaching artist who specializes in cultural arts leadership with an
    emphasis on therapeutic engagement. She is the co-founder of Kouyaté Arts, an organization dedicated to the arts, music, dance, culture, and life of the people of West Africa. As the executive director of Adefua Cultural Education Workshop, she is dedicated to community and viewed as a leader in the cultural arts sector. Kouyaté lives in Seattle.
    Date: Thursday, October 21, 2021
    Time: 6:30 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register, see belowFor more information and to register, https://www.humanities.org/event/online-umoja-unity-sustaining-african-cultural-arts-2/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by Sno-Isle Libraries.
  • YWCA Pathways Forward: Domestic Violence Awareness & Action in Spokane
    Be part of a progress minded conversation with local leaders and advocates about domestic violence in
    Spokane and the role we each play in responding to it as indiv iduals. Walk away with tools and resources
    that will help equip you with how to help a friend and support your community.
    Date: Wednesday, October 27, 2021
    Time: noon – 1:00 pm
    Location: Virtual
    Cost: Free. Need to register to receive link.
    For more information visit https://ywcaspokane.org/dvam/ or call Jemma Riedel at 509.789.9305.
  • Atomic Washington: Our Nuclear Past, Present, and Future
    At the center of every nuclear weapon in the United States is a small pit of radioactive material manufactured at a top-secret facility in Eastern Washington, a facility which today remains the most radiologically contaminated site in the Western hemisphere.
    But Washington State’s role in the nuclear era ranges far beyond the construction, operation, and ongoing cleanup of the Hanford nuclear reservation. Today, Washington has two operating nuclear reactors, one of which provides us with ten percent of our electricity. Radioactive substances are used in our state to cure diseases, build airplanes, detect pollutants, and power smoke detectors. Further, Naval Base Kitsap has the largest stockpile of nuclear weapons deployed anywhere in the country. Drawing from history, science, and popular culture, author Steve Olson reveals the many influences of nuclear materials on Washington State, and the many ways in which our state has been a pioneer in the atomic age.
    Steve Olson (he/him) is a writer who most recently authored The Apocalypse Factory: Plutonium and the Making of the Atomic Age. Olson now lives in Seattle.
    Date: Wednesday, October 27, 2021
    Time: 6:00 pm
    Location: On-line
    Cost: Free, must register
    For more information and to register, https://www.humanities.org/event/online-atomic-washington-our-nuclear-past-present-and-future/. Sponsored by humanities Washington, https://www.humanities.org/. Hosted by KCLS Foundation.
  • 7th Annual Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead)
    This is a Mexican holiday observed throughout Mexico and parts of the U.S. honoring those that have passed. Feel free to bring photos of family and friends that have passed for the altar. There will be activities for the children (face painting, piñatas, arts/crafts, etc.) in addition to music and dancing. Masks are required in-doors.
    Date: Saturday, October 30, 2021
    Time: 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
    Location: Hazen & Jaeger Funeral Home, 1306 N Pines Rd
    Cost: Free and open to the public.
    For more information contact email www.hbpaspokane@gmail.com or visit their website at
    https://www.hbpaofspokane.org/. Sponsored by Hispanic Business/Professional Association (HBPA) and Hazen & Jaeger Funeral Home. This will be an in-person event, however changes may be considered prior to the event due to COVID restrictions.

Save the Date

  • Help the YWCA Celebrate Amazing Women in Spokane.
    YWCA Spokane is asking for 2022 Women of Achievement Award Nominations.
    Recipients of a YWCA Women of Achievement award embody the mission of YWCA Spokane by giving generously of themselves to make Spokane a better place for all citizens to live. They must demonstrate leadership through their professional work or service to the community.
    We encourage submissions in the following categories:
    • Arts & Culture
    • Business & Industry
    • Carl Maxey Racial & Social Justice
    • Community Enhancement
    • Education
    • Government / Public Service
    • Science, Technology, and Environment
    • Young Woman of Achievement
    The nomination form and details about each category may be found at ywcaspokane.org/woaform and may be completed and submitted online, via email to woa@ywcaspokane.org, or by mail to 930 N Monroe St, Spokane, WA 99201.
    The deadline for submissions is November 1, 2021.
    In alignment with Women’s History Month, YWCA’s Women of Achievement awards luncheon will be moving to March. Details about the 2022 awards celebration, as well as registration, will be made available at ywcaspokane.org/woa2022 starting in October.
    All proceeds raised through the Women of Achievement awards event support YWCA Spokane’s critical services for domestic violence victims and their children, including emergency shelter, counseling, legal services, job readiness, child care, and Pre-K programs for low-income children.
  • 6th Gonzaga International Conference on Hate Studies, Justice and Equity: Challenging Hate and Inspiring Hope
    The Conference on Hate Studies is one of the leading interdisciplinary academic forums on hate, related social problems, and ways to create socially just and inclusive communities. Speakers and panelists include: Kathleen Blee, University of Pittsburg; Thomas Brudholm, University of Copenhagen, Connie Chung Joe, Asian Americans Advancing Justice, Robert Sapolksy. Stanford university; and Eric Ward, Wester States Center.
    Dates: Thursday-Saturday, November 4-6, 2021
    Location: Virtually
    Cost: Conference attendees/presenters before Sept. 30 $80.00, after Sept.30 $120. Conference student/living light attendees before Sept. 30 $20.00, after Sept. 30 $30.00
    For more information on the conference, visit www.gonzaga.edu/ICOHS. For more information about the Gonzaga Institute of Hate Studies (GIHS),visit www.gonzaga.edu/hatestudies.
  • Annual Salish School of Spokane Salmon Tales and Celebration Fundraiser
    Will feature a salmon dinner and performances by Salish School students, as well as testimonials from families served by Salish School of Spokane. Guests will have the opportunity to make a donation or pledge of support for Salish School of Spokane.
    Date: Saturday, November 6, 2021
    Time: 6:00 pm
    Location: Gonzaga Prep School
    Cost: $100 individual seat, table $600 (6 seats per table)
    For more information, visit http://www.salishschoolofspokane.org/salmontales2021.html. Guests (and Salish
    School of Spokane staff and students) will wear masks except when eating/drinking.
  • 2021 Business Crime Prevention Conference
    Topics will cover: Transient Issues and Trespassing, Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED), De-Escalation, Employee Theft and Fraud, Situational Awareness, and COPS/SCOPE. In addition, they will also cover looking at crime maps, the use of social media as a crime prevention tool, risk management, and other topics as well.
    Date: Tuesday, November 9, 2021
    Location: Virtual – On-line
    Cost: $50.00
    For more information and to register, visit www.spokanecops.org/events.

If you know of diversity/cultural events open to the public that you would like added to the monthly calendar, please e-mail Yvonne C. Montoya Zamora at yvonnecmz04@gmail.com with event details.

For other general events in Spokane, visit visitspokane.com or spokane7.com.


Radio

KYRS Radio Programs For Your Consideration. To learn more visit www.kyrs.org.

Democracy Now
Day: Monday-Friday
Time: 8:00 am – 9:00 am & 5:00 pm-6:00 pm
A national, daily, independent, award-winning news program hosted by journalists Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez. Pioneering the largest public media collaboration in the U.S. Link www.democracynow.org/. KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Democracy Now! Headlines in Spanish
Date: Saturday
Time: 7:00 am – 8:00 am
Democracy Now! is a national, daily, independent, award-winning news program hosted by journalists Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez on KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM Website: http://www.kyrs.org or www.democracynow.org.

Dragonflies on Thin Air
Day: Sunday
Time: 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
One of the few elementary age children’s radio shows produced by kids for kids in the country. The program is fun and educational for children and adults, and includes a mix of jokes, music, guests, stories, poetry, trivia and more. includes Alice, Elenor C., Lily, Rowan, Sicely, Finn, Eleanor M., Sophia, Aleric and Amara. They all go to Spokane Public Montessori elementary school. KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Irish Music on Tap
Day: Wednesday
Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Music from Ireland, Scotland, and England as well as Celtic Brittany and Canada. Hosted by Don and Rick, on KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Ke Buena.
Spanish language station. Oz 95.7.

Latin Lounge
Day: Monday
Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
A wide spectrum of Latin music. Hosted by “Corazon” on KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Queens of Noise
Day: Wednesday
Time: 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm
You will hear best in female vocalists/musicians. Hosted by Luscious Duchess, KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

The Persian Hour
Day: Saturday
Time: noon – 1:00 pm
The Persian Hour’s consists of a variety of Iranian music from hip hop to traditional, Jazz, blues, rock and roll and the usual. Also, they will share stories, recipes, and interviews. Hosted by Shahrokh, KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

The Science of Poverty
Day: Saturday
Time: 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Explores the topic of poverty. Hosted by Jesse Quintana, official Facebook site https://www.facebook.com/TheScienceOfPoverty, KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org

Sounds of Science
Day: Sunday
Time: 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Lively discussion of what’s happening in the world of science, from how it is affecting our lives to the ways we are shaping it. Hosted by Blake, Amaya, and Adam. KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Welcome Home
Day: Thursday
Time: 10:00 am – noon
A multi-genre roots based folk show. KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Women’s Media Center Live
Day: Wednesday
Time: noon – 1:00 pm
WMC Live with Robin Morgan tackles today’s hottest topics; whether it be sex, politics, art, humor, religion, culture, or news stories that go unreported, each is engaged regularly, insightfully, and intelligently. KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org.

Workin’ Woman Blues
Day: Sunday
Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Tunes to help you shake the blues out of your hair with a mix of Funk, R&B, Soul and Blues. Hosted by Jukebox Jennie. KYRS 92.3 FM or 88.1 FM. Website: http://www.kyrs.org


Have a library card? Check out Spokane County District Library. They have large digital resources including eBooks/audio books with Overdrive/Libby. With Flipster browse, download and read digital magazines and with hoopla stream popular movies, music, audiobooks, eBooks, comics and tv shows along, with many other online services. They offer curb side pickup and yes, you can still request a library card.

If you have a library card to Spokane Public Library, they also have a large digital Library resources including eBooks/audio books with Overdrive/Libby. Along with hoopla, Kanopy (movies and tv) and RBDigital (magazines) and other online resources. They also offer curb side pickup and yes, you can still request a library card.


October 2021 International/National Cultural Celebrations Calendar

National Hispanic Heritage Month – In 1968, Congress first designated the week including September 15 and 16 as National Hispanic Heritage Week to celebrate the cultural, heritage, and contributions of the diverse cultures within the Hispanic community. This week was chosen because of two historical events: independence for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua on September 15, 1821 and Mexico’s Independence Day, which was the beginning of the struggle against the Spanish on September 16, 1810. In 1988, Congress expanded the week to a full 31-day period from September 15 to October 15. This year’s theme is “Esperanza: A Celebration of Hispanic Heritage and Hope”. Visit https://nationalcouncilhepm.org/.

What will you do on 9/11 Day?
This is the 20-year anniversary of this horrific event. For more information visit their website at http://www.911day.org/. 9/11 Day is the international non-profit movement to observe September 11 every year as a day of charitable service and doing good deeds. This observance was created soon after 9/11 to provide a positive way to forever remember and pay tribute to the 9/11 victims, honor those that rose in service in response to the attacks, and remind people of the importance of working more closely together in peace to improve our world. You can watch the film, read their story, access to toolkits and lesson plans, and more.

National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM)
Public Law 176, enacted by the Congress in 1945, designated the first week in October each year as “National Employ the Physically Handicapped Week.” President Harry S. Truman designated the President’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities to carry out the Act. In 1962, the word “physically” was removed from the week’s name to acknowledge the employment needs of all Americans with disabilities. Congress expanded the week to a month in 1988 and changed its name to “National Disability Awareness Month,” which eventually evolved to its current name. The Labor Department’s Office of Disability Employment Policy took over responsibility for National Disability Employment Awareness Month in 2001.

The 2021 theme is “America’s Recovery”: Powered by Inclusion” reflects the importance of ensuring that people
with disabilities have full access to employment and community involvement during the national recovery from the
COVID-19 pandemic. For more information visit https://www.dol.gov/agencies/odep/initiatives/ndeam.
The purpose of National Disability Employment Awareness Month celebrates the contributions of workers with
disabilities and educates about the value of a workforce inclusive of their skills and talents. Held annually, National Disability Employment Awareness Month is led by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, but its true spirit lies in the many observances held at the grassroots level across the nation every year. Employers of all sizes and in all industries are encouraged to participate in NDEAM.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender History Month
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History Month promotes the teaching of LGBT history. First celebrated in
1994, October was selected, as the first and second Marches on Washington for lesbian and gay rights were held in
October in 1979 and 1987. For more information visit http://www.glbthistorymonth.com.

National Italian American Heritage Month
National Italian American Heritage Month recognizes the achievements of Americans of Italian descent as well as
Italians in American. This month was chosen to coincide with Columbus Day. Visit http://www.italianheritagemonth.com/ for more information.

German American Heritage Month
German American Heritage Month recognizes the achievements of German-Americans. German-American Day
was originally proclaimed by President Regan in 1983. About one in four persons in the United States claims
German ancestry. Visit https://nationaltoday.com/german-american-heritage-month/ for more information.
Polish American Heritage Month celebrates Polish history, culture, and pride of Polish Americans. The first Polish
settlers arrived at Jamestown, VA in 1608. Visit www.polishamericancenter.com or http://www.polishamericancenter.org/heritmo.htm.

National Hispanic Heritage Month
In 1968, Congress first designated the week including September 15 and 16 as National Hispanic Heritage Week to celebrate the cultural, heritage, and contributions of the diverse cultures within the Hispanic community. This week was chosen because of two historical events: independence for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua on September 15, 1821 and Mexico’s Independence Day, which was the beginning of the struggle against the Spanish on September 16, 1810. In 1988, Congress expanded the week to a full 31-day period from September 15 to October 15. This year’s theme is “Esperanza: A Celebration of Hispanic Heritage and Hope”. Visit https://nationalcouncilhepm.org/.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month
The purple ribbon signifies Domestic Violence Awareness Month. One in four women in Spokane will experience domestic violence at some point during her lifetime. Spokane County has the second highest rate of domestic violence in the State of Washington. In October 1987, the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month was observed. That same year the first national toll-free hotline began.

The YWCA invites Spokane businesses and individuals to spread awareness about domestic violence by
helping to blanket our community with the national color of DVAM, purple! Shine a light for survivors in October by wearing purple, displaying purple lights, and posting YWCA’s DVAM materials in store fronts and office locations. This united, visual form of support will show the community that we stand with survivors. Check out the YWCA weekly (October 6, 13, 20 & 27) educational activities to increase awareness about Domestic Violence. For more information visit https://ywcaspokane.org/dvam/ or call 509.789.9305.

  • Sept 1
    • Independence Day – Vietnam
  • Sept 4
    • Paryushana-Parva (Sept 4-11) – Jain
      Celebrated for eight days, Paryushana-Parva is the holiest time of the year and is marked b fasting and
      worship of the 23 realized teachers of the Jain faith known as Tirthankaras or Jinas.
  • October 1
    • Independence Day – Cyprus, Nigeria
      Independence from Britain in 1960.
    • National Day – China
      Commemorates the founding of the People’s Republic of China.
    • International Day of Older Persons
      This year (2021) has also been recognized as the “Digital Equity for All Ages”. International Day of
      Older Persons. Theme affirms the need for access and meaningful participation in the digital world by
      older persons. For more information, visit https://www.un.org/en/observances/older-persons-day.
  • October 2
    • Gandhi’s Birthday – IndiaMohandas Karamchand Gandi (1869-1948) is the National Father of India who adopted “non-violence” in fighting for freedom of the country, and is honored as a leader of Indian nationalism and Hindu religious beliefs.
    • International Day of Non-Violence – UNUrges the world to follow Gandhi’s example of non-violence.
    • Mehragan – Iran, Zoroastrian
      The word “Mehr” in Persian means kindness, love and friendship. It was based on the concept
      that all farmers would take their harvest to the middle of the town square and split it evenly.
  • October 3
    • National Foundation Day (Gaecheonjeol) – Korea
      Celebrates the central foundation myth of the ancient Korean kingdom of Gojoseon. The national
      holiday and the historical myth upon which it is based have long been an integral part of the Korean national identity.
    • Day of German Unity – Germany
  • October 4
    • Feast of St. Francis of Assisi – ItalySt. Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of animals, was born in 1182 at Assisi. He abandoned his
      dream of knighthood, donned the clothes of a poor farmhand and began caring for the sick. He
      founded the Franciscan Order. In remembrance of his love of animals, blessings of animals often
      take place on this date. He died October 3, 1226.
    • World Habitat Day – UN
      2021 theme “Accelerating urban action for a carbon-free world.” The theme recognizes that cities
      are responsible for some 70 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions with transport, buildings,
      energy, and waste management accounting for the bulk of urban greenhouse gas emissions.
      https://www.un.org/en/observances/habitat-day.
  • October 5
    • Republic Day – Portugal
      Commemorates the overthrow of the monarchy and establishment of a republic in 1910.
    • World Teachers Day – UN (UNESCO)
      The 2021 World Teachers’ Day will focus on the support teachers need to fully contribute to the
      recovery process under the theme “Teachers at the heart of education recovery”.
      https://en.unesco.org/commemorations/worldteachersday
  • October 6
    • Armed Forces Day – Egypt
      Commemorates the day in 1973 when combined Egyptian and Syrian military forces launched a
      surprise attack on Israel and crossed into the Sinai Peninsula, which marked the beginning of the
      October (Yom Kippur).
  • October 7
    • Navratri – Hindu
      Means ‘nine nights’ beginning on the new moon and ending on Dussehra. Dedicated to the
      goddess Durga who had nine incarnations and the power of good to destroy demons.
  • October 8
    • Independence Day – Croatia
      Commemorates the nation’s official independence from the other Yugoslav republics.
    • Day of Respect for Cultural Diversity – Argentina
    • Taiiku no hi – Japan
      Known as Health Sports Day or Sports Day is a national holiday in Japan on the second Monday in
      October. It commemorates the opening of the 1964 Summer Olympics held in Tokyo, and exists
      to promote sports and an active lifestyle.
  • October 9
    • Independence Day – Uganda
      Celebrates independence from British rule in 1962.
    • World Post Day – UN
      The anniversary of the establishment of the Universal Postal Union in 1874 in the Swiss Capital,
      Bern.
    • Han-Gul Day – South Korea
      This day commemorates the creation of the Korean alphabet 29-phonetic symbols called han gul,
      between 1443 and 1446 under the direction of King Sejong of the Yi dynasty.
  • October 10
    • Curacao Day – Curacao
      Commemorates the original discovery of the island by Spanish explorer Alonso de Ojeda in 1499.
      After World War II, became the “capital island” of the five-island group called the Netherlands
      Antilles – which was a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands until the
      Netherlands Antilles was dissolved in 2010.
    • Independence Day – Cuba
      Commemorates the beginning of Cuba’s struggle in 1868 to free itself from Spanish colonial
      power.
    • World Mental Health Day – UN
      The goal is to help raise mental health awareness which affects millions of lives.
    • Double Tenth Day – Taiwan
      Commemorates the start of the Wuchang Uprising of 10 October 1911 (10-10 or double ten),
      which led to the collapse of the Qing Dynasty and establishment of the Republic of China on
      January 1, 1912.
    • Fiji Day – Fiji
  • October 11
    • National Coming Out Day – LGBT
      The first National Coming Out Day was held on October 11, 1988. It is an international event
      which gives gay, lesbian and bisexual people the opportunity to “come out” to others about their
      sexuality. It also provides a means of increasing the visibility of LGBT people.
    • Thanksgiving Day – Canada
      Early Canadian settlers gave thanks for good harvests by decorating their churches with fruits
      and vegetables and celebrated dinner with venison and waterfowl.
    • International Day of the Girl – UN
      2021 theme – “Digital generation. Our generation.”, https://www.unicef.org/gender-equality/international-day-girl-2021.
    • Indigenous Peoples Day – USA
      Many cities in the U.S.A are replacing Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day. This day
      honors Native American heritage.
    • Indigenous Day – Spokane City
      The Spokane City Council voted 6-1 on August 29, 2016, to pass an ordinance changing the name
      of Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day.
  • October 12
    • Dia de la Raza (Day of the Race) – Mexico
      Celebrates the Hispanic and Latino heritage in the Americas.
    • Nossa Senhora De Aparecida (Our Lady of the Conception) – Brazil
      In 1717, a group of Brazilian fishermen pulled up a wooden statue of the Virgin Mary, which was
      followed by an abundant catch after a fruitless fishing day. They enshrined the statue and in
      1929 Brazil named Nossa Senhora De Aparecida the Patroness of Brazil. On October 12, 1980,
      Pope John Paul II on a visit to Brazil consecrated the Basilica of Aparecida do Norte.
    • National Day (also known as Hispanic Day) – Spain
      Commemorates the date Christopher Columbus sailed for the Americas.
    • Discovery Day – Bahamas
    • Oct 12-16 Gahambar Ayathrem – Zoroastrian
      Celebrates the creation of plant life.
  • Oct 13
    • National Boss Day – USA and Canada
      A day dedicated to appreciating our supervisors at work.
    • Durga Puja – Hindu
      This day celebrates the divine creative force of the universe and honors the 10-armed goddess
      Durga, wife of Shiva, and the destroyer of demons.
  • October 14
    • International Day for Natural Disaster Reduction – UN
      Promotes a global culture of disaster reduction, including disaster prevention, mitigation and
      preparedness.
    • Chung Yeung Festival – China, Hong Kong, Taiwan
      Families visit the graves of their ancestors. This tradition is over 2000 years old
  • October 15
    • ‘llm’ – Bahá’í
      The first day of the twelfth Bahai month. The English translation of ‘llm is knowledge.
    • Dussehra – Hindu
      Dussehra means ‘the tenth’ and celebrates the triumph of Lord Ram over the demon Ravan who
      stole his wife Sita. The great Hindu epi poem, The Ramayana, is read and enacted, called Ram
      Lila. A big effigy of Ravan is burnt accompanied by fireworks.
    • National Heroes Day – Jamaica
  • October 16
    • World Food Day –UN
      Celebrates the date of the founding of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United
      Nations in 1945.
  • October 17
    • International Day for Eradication of Poverty – UN
      To promote awareness of the need to eradicate poverty and destitution in all countries.
  • October 18
    • Independence Day – Azerbaijan
      Independence from the Soviet Union when it ceased to exist in 1991.
    • Birthday of The Báb – Bahá’í
      Born Siyyid ‘Ali Muhammed in Southwestern Iran in 1819. His title, in Arabic, means ‘The Gate’.
      Work is suspended and Bahá’ís come together for prayer and festivities.
    • Eid-Maulad-un-Nabi – Islam
      Anniversary of the birth of Prophet Muhammad. Some Muslims mark this occasion by special
      prayers, whilst other Muslims may mark the occasion by dedicating more time to read the Koran.
  • October 19
    • Birthday of Baha’u’llah – Bahá’í
      Born Mirza Husayn ‘Ali into one of the leading noble families of Persia in 1817. His name is a
      title, in Arabic, meaning ‘The Glory of God’.
  • October 20
    • Pavarana – Buddhist
      Buddha went into intensive practice during the rainy season. This marks the end of the retreat.
  • October 21
    • Kathina – Buddhist
      New robes and necessities given to ordained monks and nuns.
  • October 22
    • Abu Simbel Festival – Egypt
      Built by Ramses II, his temple is angled so that the inner sanctum lights up twice a year on the
      anniversary of his rise to the throne and once again on his birthday. Crowds pack the temple
      before sunrise to watch the shafts of light illuminate the statues of Ramses, Ra and Amon.
  • October 23
    • Chulalongkorn Day – Thailand
      Commemorates the birth of Rama V, a progressive ruler who lived in 1868-1910. Abolishing
      slavery in 1905 is considered to be his more important royal contribution during his reign.
  • October 24
    • United Nations Day – UN
      A day to commemorate the founding of the United Nations in 1945 and the effective date of the
      UN Charter.
    • Suez Victory Day – Egypt
    • World Development Information Day – UN
    • Karva Chauth – Hindu
      A one-day fast kept by married Hindu women for the well-being and longevity of the husbands.
      The husbands feed the first bite to their wives only after the see the moon.
  • October 25
    • Republic Day – Kazakhstan
    • Bank Holiday – Ireland
  • October 26
    • National Day – Austria
      The Austrian Parliament passed the constitutional law on permanent neutrality, which has been
      celebrated as the Austrian National day since 1965.
  • October 27
    • Labour Day – New Zealand
  • October 28
    • National Day – Czech Republic
      Independence Day and Creation of Czechoslovakia in 1918.
    • National Day “Ochi” – Greece
      Marks the anniversary of when the Prime Minister Metaxas said “no” (or “ochi” in Greek) to the
      invasion of Albania by the Italians, thereby entering Greece into the war.
  • October 29
    • Republic Day – Turkey
      Commemorates the Republic of Turkey in 1923.
  • October 31
    • Halloween – USA, Canada
      This tradition dates back to the Celtic people 2000 years ago, who celebrated their New Year in
      late autumn and honored Samhain or Lord of the Dead. They put candles on windows and lit
      bonfires to scare off the disembodied spirits. They wore disguises so as not to be recognized and
      always carried a lantern. The Irish traditionally carved lanterns out of turnips or potatoes, but in
      North America they used pumpkins, which were more readily available.
    • Samhain – Wicca
      Traditionally, animals were slaughtered for winter provisions and the spirits of those who have
      died in the last year are invited to a final celebration.
    • Reformation Day – Chile

Source: The majority of the Diversity/Cultural Celebrations with permission are from Creative Cultural Communications 2021 Diversity Calendar: http://usa.multiculturalcalendar.com/v/home.html


Thank you again to Yvonne C. Montoya Zamora for providing this list of diversity/cultural events. If you know of a diversity/cultural event open to the public that you would like added to this diversity monthly calendar, please e-mail Yvonne C. Montoya Zamora at yvonnecmz04@gmail.com with event details. Thank you!


Diversity, Inclusion, & Cultural Activities

Below are several resources from Everyday Democracy’s website. These are just a few on various topics: diversity, racism, education, community-police relations, immigration, mental health, etc. More can be found at their website at https://www.everyday-democracy.org/.

The pressures of an increasingly diverse nation are visible in many of our most complex public issues, such as education, taxes, welfare, and immigration. They also are evident in daily life – whether in open conflict among groups, or in tensions and misperceptions that simmer beneath the surface.
Dialogue to Change programs help people build the trusting relationships necessary for long-term change. People from diverse backgrounds and experiences develop trust, understand each other’s experiences, and work together on solutions.

In addition, we need to face racism head-on in order to have healthy communities and a strong country. Racism and gaps among racial and ethnic groups affect education, housing, health care, the justice system and job opportunities. If we’re going to make progress in our communities and in our country, people from all backgrounds and views must work together to address racism and inequities.

Dialogue-to-change programs can help people from a variety of racial, ethnic and cultural backgrounds examine the gaps among racial and ethnic groups where they live, explore approaches to creating greater equity, and create lasting change in their community.

Why addressing racism is important to building a strong democracy:
• Racism is rooted in our history and embedded in our culture
• Racism is one of the greatest barriers to solving all kinds of public problems
• Because of this, we help communities pay special attention to how structural racism and other structural inequities affect the problems they want to address

Intergenerational Equity Framework
Intergenerational equity is the practice of treating everyone fairly and justly regardless of age, with special consideration to the structural factors that privilege some age groups over others.
https://everyday-democracy.org/resources/intergenerational-equity-framework

Ripple Effects Mapping for Evaluating Community Engagement
Community engagement and Dialogue to Change strategies can lead to many positive changes in your community. However, direct impacts can be tough to track. Ripple Effects Mapping (REM) allows you, along with local leaders and others in your community, to assess impacts from your Dialogue to Change efforts.
https://www.slideshare.net/everydaydemocracy/ripple-effects-mapping-tip-sheet-for-evaluating-community-engagement

Communities Creating Racial Equity – Ripple Effects
Communities Creating Racial Equity, an Everyday Democracy initiative launched in 2007 helped us better understand the intersection of civic engagement using the Dialogue to Change process. It also helped us learn along with communities about what it takes to address racial equity. This evaluation report features five case studies in this work.
https://www.everyday-democracy.org/resources/communities-creating-racial-equity-ripple-effects-dialogues-change

Dialogue to Change Guide for School Districts
Making sure that all young people have equitable opportunities to do well in school and in life is key to the health of our communities and our whole democracy. This brief guide is designed to help you bring this essential work to your local school district and community.
https://everyday-democracy.org/resources/dialogue-change-guide-school-districts

Connecting Public Dialogue to Action and Change
Are you trying to make change in your community? This workbook will help you organize large-scale public dialogue, and it will help you connect the talk to action.
https://everyday-democracy.org/resources/connecting-public-dialogue-action-and-change

Evaluating Community Engagement (Toolkit)
Along with the Guide to Evaluating Community Engagement, and Ripple Effects Mapping Tip Sheet, this toolkit provides you with practical tools you can use in your community engagement efforts.
https://everyday-democracy.org/resources/evaluating-community-engagement-toolkit

7 Key Lessons for Addressing Racism
Fighting racism goes hand in hand with creating communities where everyone has a voice and a chance to work together. In our 25 years of working with communities to create positive change, here are key lessons we have learned about addressing racism in community initiatives.
https://everyday-democracy.org/resources/7-key-lessons-addressing-racism

Activity for Incorporating a Racial Equity Lens in Facilitation
This exercise (download activity from website) is designed to help you have a conversation about how your community’s racial dynamics may be impacting your work as dialogue facilitators. It will also help you to think about how to work together as a team more equitably during this phase of the process.
https://www.everyday-democracy.org/resources/activity-incorporating-racial-equity-lens-facilitation

Activity for Incorporating a Racial Equity Lens in Planning and Organizing
This exercise (download activity from website) is designed to help you have a conversation about how your community’s racial dynamics may be impacting your work as organizers. It will also help you to think about how to work together as a team more equitably during this phase of the process.
https://www.everyday-democracy.org/resources/activity-incorporating-racial-equity-lens-planning-and-organizing

Activity to Explore the Impact of Skin Color
The goal of this activity (download activity from website) is to illustrate the different experiences participants may have based on the color of their skin. It will help provoke thinking and dialogue about different experiences and perceptions.
https://www.everyday-democracy.org/resources/activity-explore-impact-skin-color

Activity to Explore the Impact of Stereotypes
This activity (download activity from website) will help your group start thinking about how stereotypes affect how you think about each other and work together. This will give you an opportunity to explore how stereotypes affect you and others.
https://www.everyday-democracy.org/resources/activity-explore-impact-stereotypes

Curriculum: Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow
There are many people who don’t realize that, as a country, we still have work to do to create equal opportunities for all. And many aren’t aware that all of us – of every region of the country, of every color and ethnic background – are still dealing with the impact of slavery, Jim Crow, and other policies that have perpetuated unfair advantages based on color. All of us need to deepen our understanding of our full history, so that we can move beyond “us vs. them” to “us.” Only as we understand the forces that have shaped our lives can we begin imagine and create a democracy that supports voice and belonging for all.
https://www.everyday-democracy.org/resources/curriculum-black-citizenship-age-jim-crow

Facilitators’ Racial Equity Checklist
Following each dialogue session, facilitators should take some time to debrief and make sure they are working well together (download checklist from website).
https://www.everyday-democracy.org/resources/facilitators%E2%80%99-racial-equity-checklist

Facing Racism in a Diverse Nation
A six-session discussion guide (download from website) to help all kinds of people take part in meaningful dialogue to examine gaps among racial and ethnic groups and create institutional and policy change.
https://www.everyday-democracy.org/resources/facing-racism

Dialogue for Affinity Groups
A supplemental guide (download guide from website) intended to give people with similar racial or ethnic backgrounds an opportunity to talk with each other about issues of racism in sessions preceding and following the regular diverse dialogue sessions of a community-wide study circle program. These optional discussions are designed to be used with Facing Racism in a Diverse Nation.
https://www.everyday-democracy.org/resources/dialogue-affinity-groups

Immigrant Justice is Racial Justice
Brief, 2-hour “Quick Guide” can help communities address the related issues of immigration and racial justice, by encouraging people to talk about their personal connection to race and immigration, the history of immigration policies in the United States, and the messages we hear about immigrants in the media. At the end of the conversation, participants will think about actions they can take individually and as a community. Download guide from website.
https://www.everyday-democracy.org/resources/immigrant-justice-racial-justice

Selected Events of Structural Oppression and Resistance in American History
Time line list of events of oppression and resistance in American History from 1501 to 2009. Download pdf from website.
https://www.everyday-democracy.org/sites/default/files/attachments/Selected%20Events%20of%20Structural%20Oppression%20and%20Resistance.pdf

One Nation, Many Beliefs: Talking About Religion in a Diverse Democracy
The discussion guide (download from website), is designed to strengthen relationships and understanding across religious and philosophical perspectives as a foundation for talking about inter-group tensions and the role of religion in public decision making.
https://www.everyday-democracy.org/resources/one-nation-many-beliefs-talking-about-religion-diverse-democracy